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Campaign Organization

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# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

I am new to adwords and I'm handling an account which someone had previously operated for my company. In one of the campaigns we are running there are 42 ad groups.

 

What I have a question about is the organization of these 42 ad groups. Of these 42 ad groups, twelve are of the same product line. For example:

 

My company sells Hook and Loop products. We have 12 different similar ad groups with variations in the name such as "Hook and Loop" and "Hook & Loop". Another slight variation is some are separated by what the keywords are. So instead of including keywords related to hook and loop we have one ad group which includes strictly product numbers.

 

Is it standard for campaigns to have this many ad groups centered around one type of product, or should these adgroups be condensed?

 

Thanks for any help. 

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Accepted Solutions
Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author NZgorski
September 2015

Re: Campaign Organization

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Hi NZgorski,

 

A good campaign organization is one that works. How are the ad groups doing? Are they profitable the way they are? Are some groups failing miserably?

 

The idea is to keep a close focus in your ad groups. It is logical to split ad groups by keywords, but if the ads are the same as other ad groups one might question the strategy. Some managers like to place poor performing (marginally profitable) keywords in a separate ad group or campaign. You may be looking at that.

 

I wonder about the "Hook and Loop" vs "Hook & Loop" split and how effectivde that is. Most of the time, special characters like the ampersand are ignored. Are you getting impressions and clicks from both groups? Have you looked at the search terms report?

 

The name of the ad groups is not important, it's just there to help you organize your campaigns. It's the differences in the keywords and ad copy that make a difference. I would try to determine why each ad group was created, what keywords each group targets and then see if the groups are meeting the expectations and goals. Then adjust your campaign as needed. There is no set rule or recommendation I can give you as to how many ad groups your campaign should have. You should have as many as necessary to run a successful campaign.

 

Best of Luck!

 

Pete

 

petebardo -- Deadhead doing AdWords

View solution in original post

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author NZgorski
September 2015

Re: Campaign Organization

Google Employee
# 4
Google Employee

Hi Nick,

 

Pete provided some really useful information above. 

 

Poorly performing keywords:

If your keywords have a CTR of below 1.5/2% over the last 30 days, we would recommend pausing/deleting or increasing the bids on those keywords. Quality score is based on a number of factors and individual account performance comes into play (e.g. the account CTR compared to the average CTR). In addition to this the individual performance of every element of an account will affect every other element. Ad texts, keywords, ad groups, campaigns and domains all affect each other. The longer there is bad performance of any of those elements, the more negatively affected an account can become which why we recommend deleting poorly performing keywords. 

 

Merging ad groups

I don't think it would be against the norm to include the "Hook & Loop" keywords into the "Hook and Loop" ad group. The system will consider them two different keywords but I can't see any reason to have them in two different ad groups.

 

I hope this helps!

Rachel

View solution in original post

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author NZgorski
September 2015

Re: Campaign Organization

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Hi NZgorski,

 

A good campaign organization is one that works. How are the ad groups doing? Are they profitable the way they are? Are some groups failing miserably?

 

The idea is to keep a close focus in your ad groups. It is logical to split ad groups by keywords, but if the ads are the same as other ad groups one might question the strategy. Some managers like to place poor performing (marginally profitable) keywords in a separate ad group or campaign. You may be looking at that.

 

I wonder about the "Hook and Loop" vs "Hook & Loop" split and how effectivde that is. Most of the time, special characters like the ampersand are ignored. Are you getting impressions and clicks from both groups? Have you looked at the search terms report?

 

The name of the ad groups is not important, it's just there to help you organize your campaigns. It's the differences in the keywords and ad copy that make a difference. I would try to determine why each ad group was created, what keywords each group targets and then see if the groups are meeting the expectations and goals. Then adjust your campaign as needed. There is no set rule or recommendation I can give you as to how many ad groups your campaign should have. You should have as many as necessary to run a successful campaign.

 

Best of Luck!

 

Pete

 

petebardo -- Deadhead doing AdWords

Re: Campaign Organization

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 3
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Thanks for the all of advice Pete!

 

I am still trying to best define when an ad group is successful/profitable/failing. Obviously clicks are the end goal but I am also trying to look at the Analytics and compare the keywords with visit duration on the site. I want people to be visiting our site but I want to make sure it's the right audience.

 

Of the 12 ad groups focused on hook and loops, 5 have not received a single click in the past 30 days.  These 5 "underperforming" groups have a range of impressions of 2, 22, 32, 131, and 254. My assumption is the groups with 131 and 254 impressions have potential but the others currently do not. Are these the numbers you recommend focusing on in the report? And with these low impression/click groups, are the lack of results hurting my other ad groups?

 

As you've mentioned the ampersand ad group is not generating clicks as well as others but in the last 30 days has generated 1 click and 155 impressions. Would it be against the norm to just include the "Hook & Loop" keywords into the "Hook and Loop" ad group which has received 30 clicks and 1,318 impressions in the last 30 days?

 

Thanks again for the help, it is greatly appreciated. 

 

Nick

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author NZgorski
September 2015

Re: Campaign Organization

Google Employee
# 4
Google Employee

Hi Nick,

 

Pete provided some really useful information above. 

 

Poorly performing keywords:

If your keywords have a CTR of below 1.5/2% over the last 30 days, we would recommend pausing/deleting or increasing the bids on those keywords. Quality score is based on a number of factors and individual account performance comes into play (e.g. the account CTR compared to the average CTR). In addition to this the individual performance of every element of an account will affect every other element. Ad texts, keywords, ad groups, campaigns and domains all affect each other. The longer there is bad performance of any of those elements, the more negatively affected an account can become which why we recommend deleting poorly performing keywords. 

 

Merging ad groups

I don't think it would be against the norm to include the "Hook & Loop" keywords into the "Hook and Loop" ad group. The system will consider them two different keywords but I can't see any reason to have them in two different ad groups.

 

I hope this helps!

Rachel

Re: Campaign Organization

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 5
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Ok Great. This is a HUGE help. I didn't realize that poor performing ads could affect other elements. Unfortunately the account has been untouched for the last 9 months and there are a lot of poor performing ads/keywords. It might be a large hole to climb out of....