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Broad Match Modifier Question

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Let's say I use the keyword +english +muffin in it's own ad group... The question is would I want to use "english muffin" and [english muffin] as a negative in that ad group to prevent it from triggering ad's if those two keywords are used in another ad group? Or would I be loosing impressions and possible clicks?

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Marked as Best Answer.
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Accepted by topic author Kevin O
September 2015

Re: Broad Match Modifier Question

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor
Hello, Kevin.

First of all, should you use "english muffin" as a negative, you wouldn't need to use [english muffin] as well, because "english muffin" already blocks the search term english muffin.

You wouldn't be using impressions and possible clicks only because of the fact that you're trying to direct search terms to different ad groups.

There are some advertisers who use "match type"-based campaigns and ad groups, where they direct traffic from queries matching EM keywords to one group, PM-matching queries to another ad group and BM (BMM)-matching queries to yet another ad group.

I for one think it is quite cumbersome if you have a decent-sized account.
Calin Sandici, AdWords Top Contributor | Find me on: Google+ | Twitter | LinkedIn | myBlog
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View solution in original post

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author Kevin O
September 2015

Re: Broad Match Modifier Question

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor
Hello, Kevin.

First of all, should you use "english muffin" as a negative, you wouldn't need to use [english muffin] as well, because "english muffin" already blocks the search term english muffin.

You wouldn't be using impressions and possible clicks only because of the fact that you're trying to direct search terms to different ad groups.

There are some advertisers who use "match type"-based campaigns and ad groups, where they direct traffic from queries matching EM keywords to one group, PM-matching queries to another ad group and BM (BMM)-matching queries to yet another ad group.

I for one think it is quite cumbersome if you have a decent-sized account.
Calin Sandici, AdWords Top Contributor | Find me on: Google+ | Twitter | LinkedIn | myBlog
Was my response helpful? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer.’ Learn how here.

Re: Broad Match Modifier Question

Badged Google Partner
# 3
Badged Google Partner
Good Question.

The keyword with the highest Ad Rank and Bid will win the auction for keywords.

If you negative out the Phrase and Exact you will be losing impressions to the BBM, but it they are covered in another Ad group then you will definitely want to negative them out.

What I try to do is make sure that the Exact has a higher bid then the BBM to try and push the exact. Same for Phrase ( yet I rarely use Phrase match).

The main thing is test to see which brings the best QS along with what converts.

Re: Broad Match Modifier Question

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 4
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
Thank you gentleman, you confirmed my suspicion. Eric, care to elaborate as to why you do not use "phrase" ?

Re: Broad Match Modifier Question

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 5
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
It can be cumbersome at times, thoughts on a different approach other than match type campaigns?

Thanks in advance!
Kevin

Re: Broad Match Modifier Question

Top Contributor
# 6
Top Contributor
I'm using all match types in the same ad group, bidding highest for EM, less for PM and even less for BMM, if necessary (I sometimes start with the same bid and differentiate later).

Then I analyze search terms and decide if I need new ad groups for certain search terms that get promoted as keywords.

But I mainly do advertising for e-commerce, so my search term variations are not too broad.
Calin Sandici, AdWords Top Contributor | Find me on: Google+ | Twitter | LinkedIn | myBlog
Was my response helpful? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer.’ Learn how here.

Re: Broad Match Modifier Question

Badged Google Partner
# 7
Badged Google Partner
I do it pretty much the same as Calin, @AdWiser add keyword match types within the same ad group with EM the highest bid and BBM or BM the lowest.

In many of the cases the Phrase is kind of redundant because the BBM catches that as well. If the phrase has a good QS, I might keep it, but after testing I usually don't use the Phrase.

The main thing is to test based on your keywords, bids, and competition.