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Bounce VS Exit Rate

Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆
# 1
Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆

HI All,

 

I have a question On Bounce Vs exit rate.

https://support.google.com/analytics/answer/2525491?hl=en

i have gone through with the above url  and in this url their is one example in the last, that is give below.

 

Now let's extend this example to explore the Exit rate and Bounce rate metrics for a series of single-session days on your site.

  • Monday: Page B > Page A > Page C
  • Tuesday:  Page B > Exit
  • Wednesday:  Page A > Page C > Page B
  • Thursday:  Page C > Exit
  • Friday: Page B > Page C > Page A

The % Exit and Bounce rate calculations are:

Exit Rate

  • Page A: 33% (only 3 of 5 sessions included Page A)
  • Page B: 50% (only 4 of 5 sessions included Page B)
  • Page C: 50% (only 4 of 5 sessions included Page C)

Bounce Rate:

  • Page A: 0% (no sessions began with Page A, so it has no bounce rate)
  • Page B: 33% (bounce rate is higher than exit rate, because 3 sessions started with Page B, with one leading to a bounce)
  • Page C: 100% (one session started with Page C, and it lead to a bounce)

My question is that in above example bounce rate for page A is 0% but if you see session is started from page A on Wednesday.So how it can be 0% BOUNCE rate. Even i think explanation of bounce rate for Page B is also wrong.

So please correct me if i am going wrong.

2 Expert replyverified_user
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Marked as Best Answer.
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Accepted by MosheTLV (Top Contributor)
September 2015

Re: Bounce VS Exit Rate

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Hello.

 

Bounce = Exit from the landing page. There can be no bounce for a page if there is a next page during the same session.

Calin Sandici, AdWords Top Contributor | Find me on: Google+ | Twitter | LinkedIn | myBlog
Was my response helpful? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer.’ Learn how here.

View solution in original post

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by MosheTLV (Top Contributor)
September 2015

Re: Bounce VS Exit Rate

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Hello.

 

Bounce = Exit from the landing page. There can be no bounce for a page if there is a next page during the same session.

Calin Sandici, AdWords Top Contributor | Find me on: Google+ | Twitter | LinkedIn | myBlog
Was my response helpful? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer.’ Learn how here.

Re: Bounce VS Exit Rate

Explorer ✭ ✭ ✭
# 3
Explorer ✭ ✭ ✭

Hi,

 

Bounce rate is the percentage of people who landed on a page and immediately left. Bounces are always one page sessions. While Exit rate is the percentage of people who left your site from that page.

 

Simple.

 

Thanks!

Anand Vishwakarma

Re: Bounce VS Exit Rate

Top Contributor
# 4
Top Contributor

There is just one related comment to add... if your site is a single page site. Or if all the information a visitor might be looking for is found on the landing page, the bounce rate may not mean they left immediately... it's a small point, but it is related to the time stamps that Google uses to measure time on site and pages viewed.

 

A visitor lands on the site - landing page.... Google takes a time stamp. Goes to the second page - Google takes a second time stamp. Pages viewed now equals 2 and the time on site is the difference between the time stamps - but as you can see, there is no measure of the time spent on page 2.

 

If the visitor then leaves the site Google cannot get another time stamp - so the time spent on the second page is recorded as zero.

 

If the visitor lands on a page, and leaves that page - a bounce - Google knows one page was viewed, but has no way of knowing how long a person spent on the page - could have been no time at all, but it could have been 20 minutes!

 

So - depending upon how your site is structured, and how well your content on the landing page addresses the needs of the visitor, a bounce may not be such a bad thing... I've had clients whose landing pages are designed to trigger a phone call. If a person lands on the page, reads the content (or not) and makes the call - the page has worked. and yet the bounce rate is very high. In most cases a high bounce rate is a bad thing and something that we would look to address - but there is an exception to every rule.