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Boolean keywords?

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

I have my first campaign up and running and it is doing well. However, I'd like to be able to more broadly target my keywords, but I don't want everything that seems to come with a broad match. 

What I'd like to do is:

(("dogs" || "cats" || "pigs") && ("red" || "blue" || "green" ))
or 
(dogs or cats or pigs) and (red or blue or green).

I would like to target every search query that contains any word from the left and the right, regardless of order and other words that are in the query. My keywords are in Spanish and some words have accented vowels that users sometimes use, and sometimes don't bother with while searching, as well as plurals. I 100% don't want to do a broad match because my keywords are specific to geographic regions smaller than what I can target and exclude with adwords.

I currently am filling out all possible inputs, but that leaves me with:
+dogs +red
+dogs +blue
+dogs +green
+cats +red
...etc

I am new to this so I am not even 100% sure that solution is what I am looking for. Is there a better way?

Thanks a million!

1 Expert replyverified_user
1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions
Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author Jon v
February 2017

Re: Boolean keywords?

Rising Star
# 4
Rising Star

Jon v wrote:

so if I have
+dogs +blue

I can get results for "Why does my dog feel blue?" and "The blue car nearly hit the dog"(I want this)


Yes, that's correct.

 


Jon v wrote:


so if I have
+dogs +blue

But not
"The cyan car nearly hit the dog" or "The blue car nearly hit the canine"?(I don't want this)


Broad Match modifier also consider what Google call Related Search (like "shoes" and "boots"). So if Google algorithm understands that "cyan" is related to "blue" and if "canine" is related" to dog", yes, your ad can show up.

 

If you don't want these to happen you should add "canine" and "cyan" as negative keywords, this will make sure that your ad won't be triggered.

 


Jon v wrote:

I've read both that +word gives you synonyms and misspellings and that it doesn't. I am not sure which is correct. 


Broad match modifier do consider synonyms, misspellings and other variations. You can check all that's is included here: https://support.google.com/adwords/answer/2497702

 


Jon v wrote:

 I want 100% exact match to two separate words, both of which must be included in the query for the ad to be triggered.


You can't cover absolutely all searchers without sacrificing one ow two things at the beginning, I mean, right from the start. You can't possibly begin your campaign with impeccable settings. You will always have something missing that you will discover later on.

 

If you want to cover all searches related to "dogs", you have to sacrifice some money to gather information and data to queries not so relevant to your business, and use those to include negative keywords. You can minimize the process by starting with some negatives that you already can think of (such the cyan and canine example). Always use the Keyword Planner located under the "Tool" for that too.

 

If you don't want to do that, you will have to begin with a more restrict match type such as Phrase or Exact, but sacrificing volume and variations. You won't cover all the variations you wan't, but will most likely hit a more qualified traffic.

 


Jon v wrote:

I've considered negative words, but since I am targeting geographic areas (queens, bronx etc) in a country that google doesn't divide out that specifically, it would be impractical to produce an even remotely exhaustive list. 


Don't run from this. Negative keywords are even more important than the ones you do buy to show your ads. Negative keywords are one of the most important aspects on a well optimized account. 

 

Do include as many keywords as you can as negative, and also, keep an eye for this, at least once per week.

 

Hope this helps.

_


Leandro Martinez | Basta1Click

View solution in original post

Boolean keywords?

Rising Star
# 2
Rising Star

Hi Jon, how are things?

 

IF you really want to target every search query that contains any of those word, regardless of order and other words, just add them individually, like:

 

+dogs

+cats

+pigs

 

When you use two or more words on your keyword with the plus sign, you're telling Google to only trigger your ads when BOTH words appears on the user query. Every keyword with the plus sign must exist on the user search term, so thats why you're not covering all queries and searches you want.

 

You'll need to have a very good list of negative keywords, because adding them individually will trigger a HUGE amount of queries, specially the ones that doesn't fit your business. For instance, if you only have +dogs as your keywords, every query like the ones below can show your ad:

 

how to make dogs stop barking

how to train my dog

adopt a dog

dog with upset stomach

dog games

dogs from china

youtube dog videos

 

and so on...

 

Hope this helps.

_


Leandro Martinez | Basta1Click

Boolean keywords?

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 3
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Thanks so much for the reply.

so if I have
+dogs +blue

I can get results for "Why does my dog feel blue?" and "The blue car nearly hit the dog"(I want this)

But not
"The cyan car nearly hit the dog" or "The blue car nearly hit the canine"?(I don't want this)

I've read both that +word gives you synonyms and misspellings and that it doesn't. I am not sure which is correct. But I don't want them. I want 100% exact match to two separate words, both of which must be included in the query for the ad to be triggered.

Thanks for your help. I've considered negative words, but since I am targeting geographic areas (queens, bronx etc) in a country that google doesn't divide out that specifically, it would be impractical to produce an even remotely exhaustive list. 

Thanks again!

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author Jon v
February 2017

Re: Boolean keywords?

Rising Star
# 4
Rising Star

Jon v wrote:

so if I have
+dogs +blue

I can get results for "Why does my dog feel blue?" and "The blue car nearly hit the dog"(I want this)


Yes, that's correct.

 


Jon v wrote:


so if I have
+dogs +blue

But not
"The cyan car nearly hit the dog" or "The blue car nearly hit the canine"?(I don't want this)


Broad Match modifier also consider what Google call Related Search (like "shoes" and "boots"). So if Google algorithm understands that "cyan" is related to "blue" and if "canine" is related" to dog", yes, your ad can show up.

 

If you don't want these to happen you should add "canine" and "cyan" as negative keywords, this will make sure that your ad won't be triggered.

 


Jon v wrote:

I've read both that +word gives you synonyms and misspellings and that it doesn't. I am not sure which is correct. 


Broad match modifier do consider synonyms, misspellings and other variations. You can check all that's is included here: https://support.google.com/adwords/answer/2497702

 


Jon v wrote:

 I want 100% exact match to two separate words, both of which must be included in the query for the ad to be triggered.


You can't cover absolutely all searchers without sacrificing one ow two things at the beginning, I mean, right from the start. You can't possibly begin your campaign with impeccable settings. You will always have something missing that you will discover later on.

 

If you want to cover all searches related to "dogs", you have to sacrifice some money to gather information and data to queries not so relevant to your business, and use those to include negative keywords. You can minimize the process by starting with some negatives that you already can think of (such the cyan and canine example). Always use the Keyword Planner located under the "Tool" for that too.

 

If you don't want to do that, you will have to begin with a more restrict match type such as Phrase or Exact, but sacrificing volume and variations. You won't cover all the variations you wan't, but will most likely hit a more qualified traffic.

 


Jon v wrote:

I've considered negative words, but since I am targeting geographic areas (queens, bronx etc) in a country that google doesn't divide out that specifically, it would be impractical to produce an even remotely exhaustive list. 


Don't run from this. Negative keywords are even more important than the ones you do buy to show your ads. Negative keywords are one of the most important aspects on a well optimized account. 

 

Do include as many keywords as you can as negative, and also, keep an eye for this, at least once per week.

 

Hope this helps.

_


Leandro Martinez | Basta1Click

Boolean keywords?

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 5
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Perfect.  Thanks so much for your thorough answers.  I really do appreciate it.  I will get on it with the negative keywords.  Thanks!