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Adwords help - Silo Technique

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# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Hello, I'm fairly new to these forums so I apologize if this is posted in the wrong place.  I'm a webmaster for a promotional products company and I work with an adwords consultant who has been with the company for a few years.  I've been working with him for about 6 months now and doing my best to learn analytics and PPC campaigns through articles and fiddling with analytics.

 

For the most part, I set up the landing pages on our site and coordinate with our consultant to keep him in the loop about new products that are added, current promotions, price changes, basically anything that has to do with our campaigns and the website.  My problem is he makes frequent and major changes without telling me beforehand, and our business has been suffering.

 

Even though I don't have formal training for this, reading a lot of basic articles like "10 mistakes you might be making with adwords" has given me insight to some of these mistakes.  We used to have our ad groups set up exclusively as SKAG's, but everytime he wants to try something new it seems like he pauses the entire group and then unpauses an old one.  Last week he put just our sunglass campaign into what I learned to be a "silo", so there was a broad, phrase, and exact campaign for sunglasses.  One thing I saw right away reading about this is that you have to add the exact keywords as exact match negatives to the other categories, and I also noticed the exact match query will pull a broad match text ad with generic copy and a higher CPC.  I also thought you want to bid higher on your exact match.   I then noticed the same keywords weren't always present in all 3 groups.

 

I came in this morning and he said he started running the "optimized campaign", I see he paused all 3 sunglasses campaigns entirely, started a new group called "sunglasses converting" and added some of the keywords from all of those past groups into this campaign.  There are a lot of broad match keywords in it and a mixture of all different keywords like promotional, custom, bulk, etc.  and two text ads in the group.  I thought with the silo technique you use broad match for research to determine potential keywords for exact match (and to keep adding more negatives).  

 

I'm in a difficult position and was hoping an expert could help me out here.  I love analytics and want to do better, but when I ask him about the strategy behind what he's doing his answers are usually cyclic.  I guess my main issue is we have campaigns that start to do well and then he just suddenly pauses the entire group.  It feels like we make the same mistakes over and over, and they're expensive.  I just want to have a better idea of what's going on because I'm thinking of suggesting to my boss to have another consultant look at our campaigns; any advice is appreciated.  

 

 

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Accepted by topic author Kevin S
September 2015

Re: Adwords help - Silo Technique

Top Contributor
# 4
Top Contributor

Hello again @Kevin S

The common practice with match type ad-group  strategy - (as with the classic strategy) is to bid higher on exact match and the lowest on broad. (You do want your ad to get a higher ad- rank when the search query exactly matches the keyword.)

Not as common (in my view), but a "known" practice, is  to put all better performing keywords into one ad group and to bid higher on those KWs.  I prefer, though, to structure ad-groups by match types.

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
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Re: Adwords help - Silo Technique

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Hello @Kevin S;

The  strategy suggested of separating  keywords by match types is a common one, usually followed by tightly themed ad-copies for the exact match keywords (This is the major advantage  of using this strategy)

 It would be hard to comment about the  strategy, the consultant is following, without looking into the details of the campaign structure.

I more concerned about the collaborations between you two, than about the campaign. Collaboration is essential to a successful campaign, and at the bottom line, you are the client (who pays) and he is the consultant. This issue, in my view,  should be raised to your boss...

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
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Re: Adwords help - Silo Technique

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# 3
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Yes, it has been brought up recently and it's kind of been a back and forth. What I can say is he ran the campaign in 3 groups by match type for about a week, gave the largest budget and CPC to broad, and then paused all 3 today and conglomerated what I assume were the best performers into a single group. There are all different match types and keywords in this group, totaling 62. On a basic level does it ever make sense to do this?
Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author Kevin S
September 2015

Re: Adwords help - Silo Technique

Top Contributor
# 4
Top Contributor

Hello again @Kevin S

The common practice with match type ad-group  strategy - (as with the classic strategy) is to bid higher on exact match and the lowest on broad. (You do want your ad to get a higher ad- rank when the search query exactly matches the keyword.)

Not as common (in my view), but a "known" practice, is  to put all better performing keywords into one ad group and to bid higher on those KWs.  I prefer, though, to structure ad-groups by match types.

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
Did you find any helpful responses or answers to your query? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer’