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Different listing for local vs national sales?

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# 1
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My company has an ecommerce site where we ship products all throughout the US.  We're getting ready to launch a local delivery service where orders will be placed on a sub-domain (i.e. localregion.currentsite.com).  I'd like to have the Google business listing show the local site for visitors within our delivery area and the regular retail site for everyone else.  Is there any possible way to do this?

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Accepted by Manoj S (Google Employee)
April 2016

Re: Different listing for local vs national sales?

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# 2
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Your national ecommerce site wouldn't be eligible for a Google My Business profile, so if you choose to make a profile for the local arm of your business, you'll be needing to send it to a part of your site that makes it clear it's a local service that actually delivers to customers. That'll be simple enough to set up that way, just make the website link in the profile go to localregion.currentsite.com) Then, whenever the map shows up and your business appears, it'll send customers to the local side. 

 

The thing to keep in mind, whatever result Google pulls up is going to be for a given page. The map, or a local city + keyword will hopefully pull up the local page instead of the national one, and vice versa. That's going to be more on you and how you set up the site and how and where your site gets talked about elsewhere when it comes to determining that. It would also be possible for a knowledgeable person to forward people in a given city arriving from Google to a locally relevant page, but I'm not sure if that'd be acceptable in Google's eyes or not. 

 

One downside to making a Google My Business profile for the local branch of your business, is you're going to make it much more likely that a knowledge graph comes up for a brand name search for your business, and it's likely to be a knowledge graph around just the local side of your business. My guess is you're going to run into some problems with searches typing in your band name and seeing you as a locally only company, and I'm not entirely sure how to get around that one. 

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Marked as Best Answer.
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Accepted by Manoj S (Google Employee)
April 2016

Re: Different listing for local vs national sales?

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# 2
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Your national ecommerce site wouldn't be eligible for a Google My Business profile, so if you choose to make a profile for the local arm of your business, you'll be needing to send it to a part of your site that makes it clear it's a local service that actually delivers to customers. That'll be simple enough to set up that way, just make the website link in the profile go to localregion.currentsite.com) Then, whenever the map shows up and your business appears, it'll send customers to the local side. 

 

The thing to keep in mind, whatever result Google pulls up is going to be for a given page. The map, or a local city + keyword will hopefully pull up the local page instead of the national one, and vice versa. That's going to be more on you and how you set up the site and how and where your site gets talked about elsewhere when it comes to determining that. It would also be possible for a knowledgeable person to forward people in a given city arriving from Google to a locally relevant page, but I'm not sure if that'd be acceptable in Google's eyes or not. 

 

One downside to making a Google My Business profile for the local branch of your business, is you're going to make it much more likely that a knowledge graph comes up for a brand name search for your business, and it's likely to be a knowledge graph around just the local side of your business. My guess is you're going to run into some problems with searches typing in your band name and seeing you as a locally only company, and I'm not entirely sure how to get around that one. 

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Re: Different listing for local vs national sales?

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# 3
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This all makes sense. And it sounds like the right thing to do would be to create the business profile only for the local aspect of the business (using the local site url, address, phone number, etc). I did try doing that and I even specified the delivery range to just two counties in my state. This would work fine for me but the problem I ran into was that when the company name is searched from outside of the local area, the local business profile still shows up in the results.

Is there any way to prevent this from happening? I imagine there is because there's plenty of national companies that don't operate in certain locations.

Re: Different listing for local vs national sales?

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# 4
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Yep, that problem is what I alluded to in the last paragraph of my earlier post. You're getting the local only knowledge graph showing, regardless of where a searcher is located. 

To be perfectly honest, you're easiest solution would probably be a branding solution instead of a technical one. I'd at least consider filing a DBA for a new business name to operate your local service under. For the sake of branding and recognition, since you'll want to be capitalizing on your name recognition I'm sure, you can make a name that's similar enough to be familiar, and different enough to not trigger the knowledge graph when people are searching for the national aspect of the business. Just as an example, if your national branch was Kruger Foods, maybe go with Kruger Deliveries or something. Definitely something to think about and to talk with your marketing team about. 

If you've already started building citations though, obviously a name change is going to be problematic. So if you do decide to go that route, you'll want to do it sooner than later. 

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Re: Different listing for local vs national sales?

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# 5
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I appreciate your help but I'm still unsure about this. If I were to do as you say and create a separate but similarly named entity, wouldn't I still run into the same problem? For example, if Kruger Deliveries is operating in a small area and someone searched "Kruger" in another part of the country wouldn't the same knowledge graph for Kruger Deliveries appear no matter where they are?

I also don't understand why the knowledge graph doesn't consider the searcher's location. If my business was a local, single location pizza shop and someone across the country happened to search for the same name, that knowledge graph wouldn't show up for them would it? I would think Google would interpret that information as useless to someone outside of the area the business serves.

Re: Different listing for local vs national sales?

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# 6
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In my example, I can't promise that a general search for Kruger wouldn't pull up the Knowledge Graph, you're right. I think some version of a rebrand is your only real solution though. I just answered another question here on the forum for a company called "The August Market". Pretty vague sounding name, right? Do a search for it. It's going to pull up a knowledge graph for you... or at least it does for me, even though it's not even in the same country as I am. 

There are a lot of reasons why a person not in the same city as a business might be interested in looking that business up (someone traveling to that city in the near future for example) but either way, the knowledge graph is fairly new. One of the Top Contributors here wrote a pretty interesting post a few months ago about the evolution of the Knowledge panel area... as you can see, it's still very much a work in progress. Who knows what it'll be like a year from now? It's pretty amazing what they do and where they pull data from, but it's not perfect, and your case in particular is an interesting exception I hadn't even thought of. There genuinely isn't a good solution at the moment though that'll keep your local knowledge graph from showing for national brand name searches, at least not while they have the same name. 

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