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trailing slash

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Hello!

Our client is about to rebuilt the entire site. Webmaster's telling us that the new URLs will be the same as the old ones, but with a trailing slash:

 

www.example.com/url/ instead of www.example.com/url

 

My question is if there's any problem with Destination URLs of the ads running now. Should we change the Destination URL of all ads by adding trailing slashes or it will work as now?

 

Thank you!

2 Expert replyverified_user
1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions
Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author Jordi M
September 2015

Re: trailing slash

Top Contributor
# 6
Top Contributor
Hi Jordi M,

Interesting question. First, the link to Matt Cutts' article won't work, you'll have to remove the last close parenthesis to get to it. I'm not sure I see a problem linking to an article by him. He's like the main guy, right?

Anyway, the way I understand how all this works is if there is no file extension in the URL, modern browsers will add the trailing slash. A trailing slash indicates a folder. Sites that use a CMS like WordPress or Joomla are set up to read the part of the URL beyond the script's location as input parameters. Those programs strip that part of the URL and do a db search to locate the proper content. I have on WP site set up with URL's like this, so I did a quick test. A trailing slash is indeed added (Firefox 35.0.1), and it does not break the link.

If you enter only the domain in the address bar, no trailing slash is added. Actually, if you include a trailing slash on a domain only URL, it gets stripped before making the request.

There are reasons Matt's article says these could be different URL's. That folder "could" have a default page other than index.html, index.php, etc. That would mean www.example.com/index.html delivers different content than www.example.com if the default page is home.html. While these two URL's are "technically" different, they could deliver the same content. Matt's article is about canonicalization , or how to provide the best URL for Google's search engine. It does not necessarily apply to this question.

I would definitely test this before taking my advice. But my opinion on this (opinion because I haven't tested on your server) is that there's no difference between the URL with the trailing slash and the URL without, since it will be added by the browser anyway. Test this on your site a couple ways. First, enter one of your old URL's without the trailing slash. When you get to the page, is there now a trailing slash? Most likely there is. Now, put the same URL in a link from another site. Use your Facebook page or something like that if you don't have any other sites to use for testing. Do not include the trailing slash in the URL. Now, click on that link. What do you see? Same content? Trailing slash on the URL? If you get the same content regardless of the trailing slash, you won' t need to update your destination URL's.

Best of Luck!

Pete


petebardo -- Deadhead doing AdWords

View solution in original post

Re: trailing slash

Follower ✭ ✭ ☆
# 2
Follower ✭ ✭ ☆
Hello,

technically these urls are different. A web server could return completely different content for them. (https://www.mattcutts.com/blog/seo-advice-url-canonicalization/)

You can check (or ask your client) what will be with "old" urls. I suppose your client will add 301 redirect from old urls to new. If so you have to make sure that gclid/utm/other trackvalues do not fall off of redirect.

Hope this help

Re: trailing slash

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 3
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
Thank you so much!

Re: trailing slash

[ Edited ]
Top Contributor
# 4
Top Contributor

@Nadin Z ;

 

Please try (as much as possible)  to refer  users only  to resources supported or endorsed by Google. There are thousands of  blogs out there, and we cannot verify their accuracy. Since this is a Google property, and users trust it, and consider it  as a  reliable source, we do our best to refer users only to official help documentation, or  other resources endorsed by Google.

Thanks

 

 

Jordi;

Let me ping one of our top contributors on this issue;

@petebardo ?

 

 

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
Did you find any helpful responses or answers to your query? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer’

Re: trailing slash

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 5
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
Ok!

Thanks.
Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author Jordi M
September 2015

Re: trailing slash

Top Contributor
# 6
Top Contributor
Hi Jordi M,

Interesting question. First, the link to Matt Cutts' article won't work, you'll have to remove the last close parenthesis to get to it. I'm not sure I see a problem linking to an article by him. He's like the main guy, right?

Anyway, the way I understand how all this works is if there is no file extension in the URL, modern browsers will add the trailing slash. A trailing slash indicates a folder. Sites that use a CMS like WordPress or Joomla are set up to read the part of the URL beyond the script's location as input parameters. Those programs strip that part of the URL and do a db search to locate the proper content. I have on WP site set up with URL's like this, so I did a quick test. A trailing slash is indeed added (Firefox 35.0.1), and it does not break the link.

If you enter only the domain in the address bar, no trailing slash is added. Actually, if you include a trailing slash on a domain only URL, it gets stripped before making the request.

There are reasons Matt's article says these could be different URL's. That folder "could" have a default page other than index.html, index.php, etc. That would mean www.example.com/index.html delivers different content than www.example.com if the default page is home.html. While these two URL's are "technically" different, they could deliver the same content. Matt's article is about canonicalization , or how to provide the best URL for Google's search engine. It does not necessarily apply to this question.

I would definitely test this before taking my advice. But my opinion on this (opinion because I haven't tested on your server) is that there's no difference between the URL with the trailing slash and the URL without, since it will be added by the browser anyway. Test this on your site a couple ways. First, enter one of your old URL's without the trailing slash. When you get to the page, is there now a trailing slash? Most likely there is. Now, put the same URL in a link from another site. Use your Facebook page or something like that if you don't have any other sites to use for testing. Do not include the trailing slash in the URL. Now, click on that link. What do you see? Same content? Trailing slash on the URL? If you get the same content regardless of the trailing slash, you won' t need to update your destination URL's.

Best of Luck!

Pete


petebardo -- Deadhead doing AdWords

Re: trailing slash

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 7
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
Thank you!