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modified broad match and single word search terms

[ Edited ]
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

I am currently looking into the keyword status of the words in my account and am trying to understand the situation with the modified board match status. I have been reading extensively on this and it seems to be most beneficial for multiple word search terms (i.e. formal shoes) rather than single word search terms (shoes) - am I right in assuming this? I see no benefit in using this for single word search terms, can anyone recommend any benefits or experienced any benefits 

 

I do have some keywords which aren't just single words and was wondering how it would work on these. For example I have the keywords vibrating sieves and vibratory sieves as board matches, if I changed one of the words to a modified board match (i.e. +vibrating sieves) would it serve the other one?

 

I'm trying to improve the performance of my account focusing mainly on CTR and I think one of the problems why the CTR is so low is because 98% of my keywords are board match and therefore have high impression rates and therefore a low CTR. My strategy behind improving this is to find the actual search terms which are triggering these ads and start using these in my account and then slowly remove the board match words. My only concern with this is that I am going to loose a potential customer which is stopping me from making the leap - is there any way I can avoid such a situation or minimise such a risk? 

 

Thanks in advance for your help

 

 

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Accepted by rashu (Google Employee)
September 2015

Re: modified board match and single word search terms

[ Edited ]
Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Hello RF marketing , welcome aboard our community;

 

As for your first question : you need to add the modifier (+) before every word: e.g: +vibrating +sieves (or +vibrate +sieve)


As for your second comment: that's a "dilemma" any AdWords advertiser faces. Go through an excellent discussion covering this topic:  Match types and bidding strategy, we had a few days ago.

 

-Moshe

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
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Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by rashu (Google Employee)
September 2015

Re: modified board match and single word search terms

Explorer ✭ ☆ ☆
# 3
Explorer ✭ ☆ ☆

Hello

 

With regards to the second part of your post I would recommend adding all the keywords which you feel are relevant and you want your ads to appear for in as exact match keywords.

 

This should help increase the % of exact match keywords in the account.

 

As well as adding in the actual match terms in as exact keywords (which you're already doing) I'd recommend adding in negative keywords too. This will help with the targeting of your account and lower CPC's/increase CTR etc.

 

You also need to be wary that if you account is full of broad match keywords across multiple campaigns/adgroups that they could be competitng with each other. It is really important to get the correct negatives across your account.

 

There isn't an easy quick fix answer to this but it takes a lot of time and effort.

 

Hope this helps.

 

Cheers

Kane

View solution in original post

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by rashu (Google Employee)
September 2015

Re: modified board match and single word search terms

[ Edited ]
Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Hello RF marketing , welcome aboard our community;

 

As for your first question : you need to add the modifier (+) before every word: e.g: +vibrating +sieves (or +vibrate +sieve)


As for your second comment: that's a "dilemma" any AdWords advertiser faces. Go through an excellent discussion covering this topic:  Match types and bidding strategy, we had a few days ago.

 

-Moshe

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
Did you find any helpful responses or answers to your query? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer’
Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by rashu (Google Employee)
September 2015

Re: modified board match and single word search terms

Explorer ✭ ☆ ☆
# 3
Explorer ✭ ☆ ☆

Hello

 

With regards to the second part of your post I would recommend adding all the keywords which you feel are relevant and you want your ads to appear for in as exact match keywords.

 

This should help increase the % of exact match keywords in the account.

 

As well as adding in the actual match terms in as exact keywords (which you're already doing) I'd recommend adding in negative keywords too. This will help with the targeting of your account and lower CPC's/increase CTR etc.

 

You also need to be wary that if you account is full of broad match keywords across multiple campaigns/adgroups that they could be competitng with each other. It is really important to get the correct negatives across your account.

 

There isn't an easy quick fix answer to this but it takes a lot of time and effort.

 

Hope this helps.

 

Cheers

Kane

Re: modified broad match and single word search terms

Follower ✭ ✭ ✭
# 4
Follower ✭ ✭ ✭

You don't have to add the modifier "+" in front of every keyword. Any keyword with the modifier has to be in the search query, or a close variation, and any keyword without the modifer is treated as broad match. 

 

As an example with my company's account, the term +adwords +training would only match to search terms that include both keywords ie "adwords training" or "adwords training in chicago". The term +adwords training matches to "adwords classes" and "adwords courses". 

 

The benefit for using a modifier with single terms is that you are telling AdWords not to treat it as a broad match and only match to queries that are close variants of the single word.