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locations

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Hi everyone

 

Can anyone help please? I have campaigns targeted at dirffernt areas, my kewords are the same for each campaign more or less.  My question is, do you have to put the relevent location within each campaign before each keyword??

 

 

Regards

 

Angie

3 Expert replyverified_user
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Marked as Best Answer.
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Accepted by Karl (Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆)
September 2015

Re: locations

Google Employee
# 2
Google Employee

Hi Angie,

 

I'm not 100% sure what you're asking, but I'll guess.  Is it something like this?

Campaign 1: targets the Chicago area in its campaign settings

Keywords are "hotels", "spas", etc.

 

Campaign 2: targets the San Francisco area in its campaign settings

Keywords are "hotels", "spas", etc.

 

Are you asking whether you should change your keywords so that they're "chicago hotels", "chicago spas", "san francisco hotels", etc?

 

If so, opinions differ on this.  Many (most?) advertisers used to do this because in the past our location targeting wasn't always accurate.*  But it's not clear that adding the keywords even mattered then, because our ad serving system uses geographic terms in in the query as location signals in addition to things like the user's IP address and ISP.  So our system should have been able to figure this out on its own.

 

My suggestions would be:

a) Wait for a few advertisers to chime in here with their experiences.

b) Maybe try a few keywords both ways and see if it makes a difference.  Hard data really helps with decisions like this.

 

Laura

AdWords engineer

 

* Location targeting still isn't perfect.  We use things like the user's IP address.  For users who get their service from big, national ISPs, the addresses don't always map to a precise location.  (I bet there's an artical on "IP geolocation" on wikipedia with more background on this.)  There are various other sources of inaccuracy too.  This is one reason we use geo terms from the query as part of the location signal.

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Solution
Accepted by Karl (Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆)
September 2015

Re: locations

Top Contributor
# 3
Top Contributor

Hi Angie,

 

As Laura pointed out, opinions on this topic will most certainly vary but from what I've heard recently, after the recent changes in advanced targeting options, what you decide to do will be based on these settings:

 

Advanced location targeting options allow you to reach:

    People in, searching for, or viewing pages about your targeted location (default)
    People in your targeted location
    People searching for or viewing pages about your targeted location

Advanced location exclusion options allow you to exclude:

    People in, searching for, or viewing pages about your excluded location (default)
    People in your excluded location

Based on the fact that you are using the same keywords in all campaigns, you can probably get away with NOT using location terms and rely on Geotargeting and Advanced Option to accomplish what you are looking to do.

 

Also, it's never a bad idea to run some tests for yourself.  Include a 'geographic' ad group with geo-modified terms and see how they work.  This also could vary between locations. 

 

I wish there was a definitive answer here but I'm afraid I do not have one for you. 

 

To answer your question directly, no you do not need to add in geo-modifiers to your keyword lists.

 

Hope this helps!

 

-Tom

 

 

Tommy Sands, AdWords Top Contributor | Community Profile | Twitter | Philly Marketing Labs
Did you find any helpful responses or answers to your query? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer.’

View solution in original post

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by Karl (Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆)
September 2015

Re: locations

Google Employee
# 2
Google Employee

Hi Angie,

 

I'm not 100% sure what you're asking, but I'll guess.  Is it something like this?

Campaign 1: targets the Chicago area in its campaign settings

Keywords are "hotels", "spas", etc.

 

Campaign 2: targets the San Francisco area in its campaign settings

Keywords are "hotels", "spas", etc.

 

Are you asking whether you should change your keywords so that they're "chicago hotels", "chicago spas", "san francisco hotels", etc?

 

If so, opinions differ on this.  Many (most?) advertisers used to do this because in the past our location targeting wasn't always accurate.*  But it's not clear that adding the keywords even mattered then, because our ad serving system uses geographic terms in in the query as location signals in addition to things like the user's IP address and ISP.  So our system should have been able to figure this out on its own.

 

My suggestions would be:

a) Wait for a few advertisers to chime in here with their experiences.

b) Maybe try a few keywords both ways and see if it makes a difference.  Hard data really helps with decisions like this.

 

Laura

AdWords engineer

 

* Location targeting still isn't perfect.  We use things like the user's IP address.  For users who get their service from big, national ISPs, the addresses don't always map to a precise location.  (I bet there's an artical on "IP geolocation" on wikipedia with more background on this.)  There are various other sources of inaccuracy too.  This is one reason we use geo terms from the query as part of the location signal.

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by Karl (Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆)
September 2015

Re: locations

Top Contributor
# 3
Top Contributor

Hi Angie,

 

As Laura pointed out, opinions on this topic will most certainly vary but from what I've heard recently, after the recent changes in advanced targeting options, what you decide to do will be based on these settings:

 

Advanced location targeting options allow you to reach:

    People in, searching for, or viewing pages about your targeted location (default)
    People in your targeted location
    People searching for or viewing pages about your targeted location

Advanced location exclusion options allow you to exclude:

    People in, searching for, or viewing pages about your excluded location (default)
    People in your excluded location

Based on the fact that you are using the same keywords in all campaigns, you can probably get away with NOT using location terms and rely on Geotargeting and Advanced Option to accomplish what you are looking to do.

 

Also, it's never a bad idea to run some tests for yourself.  Include a 'geographic' ad group with geo-modified terms and see how they work.  This also could vary between locations. 

 

I wish there was a definitive answer here but I'm afraid I do not have one for you. 

 

To answer your question directly, no you do not need to add in geo-modifiers to your keyword lists.

 

Hope this helps!

 

-Tom

 

 

Tommy Sands, AdWords Top Contributor | Community Profile | Twitter | Philly Marketing Labs
Did you find any helpful responses or answers to your query? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer.’

Re: locations

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 4
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Hi laura

 

Thanks for your advice, that’s exactly what I meant.  I am a totally new to all this and sometimes don’t get my point across in the right way.  I am researching everything myself and learning bit by bit and don’t really understand everything at the point of reading, but I do get there in the end.   

 

Regards

 

Angie  

Re: locations

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 5
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Hi Tom

 

Thanks for your advice I will check out advanced targeting options and see if this gives me any clarification.  As I said to laura I am a complete beginner and sometimes are not sure how to put my question across without sounding dare I say stupid? 

 

 

Regards

 

Angie

Re: locations

Top Contributor
# 6
Top Contributor

Hi Angie,

 

No such thing here as silly questions.

 

Adwords is quite sophisticated and leads to questions.  Please come back and continue to ask. 

 

Lots of great, helpful folks here with LOTS of experience.

 

Also, there are numerous resources out there, as you have probably found, from set up to advanced strategies.

 

If you're looking for anything else, please don't hesitate to ask.

 

Good Luck!

 

-Tom

Tommy Sands, AdWords Top Contributor | Community Profile | Twitter | Philly Marketing Labs
Did you find any helpful responses or answers to your query? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer.’

Re: locations

Google Employee
# 7
Google Employee

Thanks for the follow-up, Tom.  Some of those location targeting features are new since the last time I worked on the UI or targeting parts of AdWords.  I didn't know we'd made it that flexible.  I'll have to go play with it in my small test account.

 

Laura

Re: locations targeting;

Top Contributor
# 8
Top Contributor

Hello Angie;

 

Targeting (my favorite) ...OH targeting.....


I'd like to underline a point already been said both Laura and Tom, ,

But, First let me say that targeting is one of the most complex tasks in AdWords, so continue to explore it....

 

Now, if you target by intent (i.e.. adding the location name to a keyword), be aware that users outside your location may also see your ads. if you are targeting residents of SF for flights from SFO to other destinations, you should only target by location. If you also target by intent the query "flights to SFO" may show your ads to residents outside SF, while you are targeting only those who live within SF area.

 

My advice, since it's really complex: Go back to Venn Diagram and draw circles of targeting areas, and exclusions by location and by intent. (Imagine what happens if you also need to target by language....Smiley Surprised)

 

@Laura: I wrote in another post ( I don't recall where), that for those of us outside the US, where IP geo targeting is even less accurate than in the US, trying to target by location, AND by intent (to overcome the lack of reliable geo-location targeting), as well as by language -  on the same campaign, has made targeting very "sensitive" to mistakes. Engineering needs to take the issue back to R&D, and come back with a solution, that will show the advertiser the final "group" of audiences targeted. (I suggest to try showing that visually, using Venn diagram) . Targeting on the display network is even tougher: Try to understand this table without knowing Venn Diagram ). Well, this my personal view on the subject.

 

-Moshe

 

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
Did you find any helpful responses or answers to your query? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer’

Re: locations

Badged Google Partner
# 9
Badged Google Partner

What does the search terms report tell you? Are the users in your targeted locations using the geographic modifiers in their KW query strings? If so, which of those terms convert and actually generate a positive return on ad spend? Rather than going through all the effort to add (or not, whatever you decide) dozens, hundreds, thousands (millions?), of KW term variations someone, somewhere may search for, try adding or excluding KW's based on the search terms report. That way you know, the only KW's you are managing are those that someone in your target market, who has expressed some interest in your business, is actually using to find your business, and actually have enough search volume, high enough QS, etc. to be able to show an ad.

 

Then - Slowly and carefully consider editing your targeting options. As Laura said, location targeting has improved dramatically since the "old days" Smiley Happy, but still isn't perfect. If you are too restrictive with your targeting, you might not serve ads to some valuable users within your targeted area, because the location signals from the user don't match the settings of your campaign exactly.

 

Check out the dimensions tab, geographic details to see where your ads are actually showing, and whether or not the specific locations targeted are actually the most profitable. San Fransisco may be the greater metro area which the user is located in, but the specific suburbs/neighborhood geographic KW modifiers may be the more valuable terms. Try to use all the information you can, before making any decisions as to what you should, or shouldn't do. Each situation is different. Smiley Happy

 

Is this your business, or are you managing the account for the company you work for? If the latter, what kind of Monday morning might you have, if the boss doesn't see their ads when searching over the weekend, because their location targeting signals are considered outside of the targeted area? Smiley Sad

Tom