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keyword lists - which way?

[ Edited ]
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Keyword List A:

  • how to groom a yorkie
  • grooming a yorkie
  • grooming my yorkie
  • yorkie grooming tips
  • etc.

Keyword List B:

  • +groom +yorkie

1) if List A keywords were searches, would List B catch all the searches?

2) what's the point of adding all those variations in List A if they are all broad match? in theory, wouldn't the first keyword suffice, deeming the others redundant?

3) is there an upside/downside to either method?

 

To me, List B seems like the sensible way to go about it because it will catch everything with "groom" and "yorkie" and their variants.

 

4) Say I decide on List A and someone searches for "yorkie groom". Surely one of the keywords will catch it -- how does adwords decide which will catch it?

 

Thanks!

2 Expert replyverified_user

Re: keyword lists - which way?

Top Contributor Alumni
# 2
Top Contributor Alumni

HI

1) if List A keywords were searches, would List B catch all the searches?

 Keyword +groom +yorkie will only catch 'how to groom a yorkie' assuming "close varients is off"

If you add another keyword to List B +grooming +yorkie then two keywords in List B be will match everything in List A

 

2) what's the point of adding all those variations in List A if they are all broad match? in theory, wouldn't the first keyword suffice, deeming the others redundant?

In theory yes you are right you dont need other keywords if you are on broad match but consider this 

If you are running these on broad match your ad may as well trigger for search term 'grooming tips for men'

 

3) is there an upside/downside to either method?

There is an upside and downside to everything Smiley Happy I wouldd personally go with List B but also have other long tail keywords like 'grooming my yorkie' on exact and phrase match.

 

4) Say I decide on List A and someone searches for "yorkie groom". Surely one of the keywords will catch it -- how does adwords decide which will catch it?

 Chances are it will get triggered from 'how to groom a yorkie' assuming you are not bidding really low for that keyword. This will happen because both words in search term are present in your keyword. 

I hope this helps

 

Regards, Nik
LinkedIn  |   @nikhilparachure | My Blog

Re: keyword lists - which way?

[ Edited ]
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 3
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Thanks for such a quick and detailed response!

Regarding close variants, do we have a way of knowing what Google considers to be a close variant? Besides just looking at searches that the keywords catch, is there any other way of knowing if "clip", "trim", and "cut" are close variants of "groom"?

Re: keyword lists - which way?

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 4
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
But wait! I just read this:

"Quality score and first page bid estimates will still be based off a keyword’s exact match type, not variants of it. For this reason, it’s still important to include plurals, misspellings, etc., when building out keyword lists."

So the keyword in List B will probably have a low quality score then?

Re: keyword lists - which way?

Top Contributor Alumni
# 5
Top Contributor Alumni

Hi

Well honestly I dont know Google's logic behind close variants. I doubt anyone other than Google knows it either. 

I personally like to turn that feature off, downside is; turning it off means you have to work more on close variants and miss spellings. But you cant have cake and eat it too.

Hope this helps

 

 

Regards, Nik
LinkedIn  |   @nikhilparachure | My Blog

Re: keyword lists - which way?

Top Contributor
# 6
Top Contributor

I did not quite follow the structure you are suggesting ...

 

However ads for closed variants:

Close variants are integrated part of BMM  that   include ing form third person form (e.g "s") ; singular and plural, and abbreviations. It does not include misspelling, (In non English language, it also includes gender formats for nouns, and verbs - if exist)

 

For  phrase match and exact match  if   "close variants"  is on,  it includes also misspelling. Basically, the difference between BMM and  "phrase match  with closed variants" is reduced to misspelling only...

 

-Moshe

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
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Re: keyword lists - which way?

Top Contributor
# 7
Top Contributor

Hi Mikey555,

 

Keeping all the other advice you have received in mind, List A seems like possible candidates for phrae or exact match. As broad match, they are probably too broad. You might consider also BMM for List A, as they could be more valuable to you as keywords.

 

Best of Luck!

 

Pete

 

petebardo -- Deadhead doing AdWords

Re: keyword lists - which way?

[ Edited ]
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 8
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Thanks.

 

The structure is this:

- List A specifies specific keywords (I now understand you wouldn't want these keywords to be broad match)

- List B has broad match "catch-alls" so I can learn the keywords people use. I'm aware that there's also a keyword tool for this.

 

Can you confirm that a keyword's Quality Score is improved by only exact matches? If I make List A into BMM keywords, I believe my Quality Score wouldn't improve unless the click came from an exact match.