AdWords is now Google Ads. Our new name reflects the full range of advertising options we offer across Search, Display, YouTube, and more. Learn more

Ads
4.9K members online now
4.9K members online now
Dive into advanced features like Remarketing, Flexible Bid Strategies, AdWords Editor, and AdWords Scripts
Guide Me
star_border
Reply

is there any literature about phrase match and exact match?

Follower ✭ ✭ ☆
# 1
Follower ✭ ✭ ☆

am looking for more indepth literature, forums and posts about phrase and exact match to see if i can learn more than about the keywords types

1 Expert replyverified_user
1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions
Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by MosheTLV (Top Contributor)
September 2015

Re: is there any literature about phrase match and exact match?

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by MosheTLV (Top Contributor)
September 2015

Re: is there any literature about phrase match and exact match?

Re: is there any literature about phrase match and exact match?

Follower ✭ ✭ ☆
# 3
Follower ✭ ✭ ☆
i got to read all that, i am looking for more information eg how quality score changes, how to get better phrase matches, which costs more, etc coz i feel there is more on them and not much is written on them other than describing what they are

Re: is there any literature about phrase match and exact match?

Badged Google Partner
# 4
Badged Google Partner
Quality Score is an estimate of how relevant your ads, keywords, and landing page are to a person seeing your ad. Having a high Quality Score means that our systems think your ad, keyword, and landing page are all relevant and useful to someone looking at your ad. You can find out your Quality Score for any of your keywords, and there are several things you can do to help improve your Quality Score.

Checking your Quality Score

You can check your Quality Score by looking within your Keywords tab. There are a couple ways to check your Quality Score, as shown below.

Run a keyword diagnosis:

Click the Campaigns tab at the top.
Select the Keywords tab.
Click the white speech bubble Ad disapproval bubble next to any keyword's status to see details about that keyword's Quality Score. You'll be able to see ratings for expected clickthrough rate, ad relevance, and landing page experience.

How we calculate Quality Score

Every time someone does a search that triggers your ad, we calculate a Quality Score. To calculate this Quality Score, we look at a number of different things related to your account. By improving the following factors you can help improve your Quality Score:

Your keyword's past clickthrough rate (CTR): How often that keyword led to clicks on your ad
Your display URL's past CTR: How often you received clicks with your display URL
Your account history: The overall CTR of all the ads and keywords in your account
The quality of your landing page: How relevant, transparent, and easy-to-navigate your page is
Your keyword/ad relevance: How relevant your keyword is to your ads
Your keyword/search relevance: How relevant your keyword is to what a customer searches for
Geographic performance: How successful your account has been in the regions you're targeting
Your ad's performance on a site: How well your ad's been doing on this and similar sites (if you're targeting the Display Network)
Your targeted devices: How well your ads have been performing on different types of devices, like desktops/laptops, mobile devices, and tablets – you get different Quality Scores for different types of devices


How Quality Score affects you

Quality Score is used in several different ways and can affect the following things in your account:

Ad auction eligibility: Higher Quality Scores make it easier and cheaper for a keyword to enter the ad auction.
Your keyword's actual cost-per-click (CPC): Higher Quality Scores lead to lower CPCs. That means you pay less per click when your keyword has a higher Quality Score.
Your keyword's first page bid estimate: Higher Quality Scores lead to lower first page bid estimates. That means it's easier for your ad to show on the first page of search results when your keyword has a higher Quality Score.
Your keyword's top of page bid estimate: Higher Quality Scores lead to lower top of page bid estimates. That means it's easier for your ad to show towards the top of the page when your keyword has a higher Quality Score.
Ad position: Higher Quality Scores lead to higher ad positions. That means your ad can show up higher on the page when your keyword has a higher Quality Score.
In a nutshell, higher Quality Scores typically lead to lower costs and better ad positions. The AdWords system works best for everybody – advertisers, customers, publishers, and Google – when the ads we show are relevant, closely matching what customers are looking for. Relevant ads tend to earn more clicks, appear in a higher position, and bring you the most success.

Re: is there any literature about phrase match and exact match?

Follower ✭ ✭ ☆
# 5
Follower ✭ ✭ ☆
i wanted to know the relation of quality score with key word match types i,e broad, phrase and exact matches

Re: is there any literature about phrase match and exact match?

Top Contributor
# 6
Top Contributor
After a Google search for "How does match type affect quality score", the first result was the PPC hero guide to quality score (a great resource by the way).

http://www.ppchero.com/ultimate-guide-to-adwords-quality-score/

Changing Match Types Alters Quality Score

Google essentially measures Quality Score without considering keyword match type. Therefore, if you have a broad, phrase, and exact match of the same keyword in your account, all three will have the same Quality Score. Google will determine a keyword’s QS based on an exact match with a query. For example, the broach match keyword pink slippers will have the same Quality Score in relation to the search query pink slippers as it would if it were an exact match. Therefore, changing a keyword’s match type does not directly alter keyword-level Quality Score.

Re: is there any literature about phrase match and exact match?

Collaborator ✭ ✭ ✭
# 7
Collaborator ✭ ✭ ✭

Hello All, I hope you don't mind me joining the conversation.

This is what I have learned about the QS and matching the searchers intent from here : link

 

Quote : 

Where possible, they also favor looking at the CTR when the keyword in your account matches the search query exactly (don’t confuse this with the “exact match” keyword match type), and they normalize the CTR based on the number of ads on the page and your ad’s position amongst them.

 

My conclusion is that no matter what match type you use, the important thing is to anticipate for what people might type when searching .This changes constantly. It helps an account to have a long list of search terms in various ad groups picked from your organic results , from the new adwords report 

 

http://adwords.blogspot.ro/2013/08/analyze-and-optimize-your-search.html