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What would be the benefit?

[ Edited ]
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# 1
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I have seen advertisers add all the match types of one keyword in one ad group. For Instance, I have keyword web design company so we have taken the three match types on same keyword- "web design company", [web design company] in one adgroup. So what would be the benefit?

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Accepted by topic author Monikaji
September 2015

Re: What would be the benefit?

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# 5
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I would say that no matter the structure you set, you should bid higher on exact match; and minimum on broad match. (And in between for phrase match) - The logic is clear: when a search query matches exactly your keyword, that means that this is the product /ervice the user is looking for, and you want your ad to rank higher.

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
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Marked as Best Answer.
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Accepted by topic author Monikaji
September 2015

Re: What would be the benefit?

Top Contributor
# 10
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Using the negative match types across the ad groups is, as much as anything a failsafe-  it simply forces Google to trigger the ad from the most relevant ad group - which in the end will be the cheapest option - and - you get to write ad copy that most closely resonates with the search term...

 

Suppose your exact match is [blue widgets] and the search phrase is blue widgets. The ad would have Blue Widgets in the headline and probably in the display url. The landing page would be for blue widgets... probably going to get your best conversion rates with this approach.

 

Of course, there will be lots of people who search for something with "blue widgets" in the search term--- "where can I buy blue widgets" - "are blue widgets better than red widgets" and so on.

 

We proably don't want to write such a tightly targeted ad for this search term. And we'd probably find that a very tightly related landing page might not work quite so well across the board in this case.... but we'd still want this ad to trigger for the term blue widgets ahead of a search term such as  - where can I get widgets - where our modified broad keyword might be  blue +widgets

 

There are so many factors that determine which keyword triggers and ad that simply running each match type in it's own ad group might not result in the ideal situation... although it "should" - but using the negatives forces the situation. And it's easy to do using the AdWords Editor - it's basically copy - paste - select all - change match type.

 

As with all things - testing will tell you whether this makes a significant difference in your case.

 

 

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Re: What would be the benefit?

[ Edited ]
Participant ✭ ✭ ☆
# 2
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HI Monikaji

 

Welcome to the AdWords community Smiley Happy

 

I think the idea behind using all match types is that it could increase your exposure for those keywords, and then after they have run for a little while you could perform an analysis and pause or delete the poor performers.

 

If you look at the article below about using keyword matching options, it advises to start off broad and use the search terms report after you have enough account stats to see how the terms are triggering your ads. You can add appropriate match types from there-

 

Using keyword matching options

 

I've found an article about this called "Use all 3 Google AdWords Keyword match types for Google search". I thought that you may like to read it.

 

Kind regards

 

Re: What would be the benefit?

[ Edited ]
Top Contributor
# 3
Top Contributor

Hi Monikaji,

 

You can have all the match type in one ad group but analysing and optimizing each match type will be very difficult when they are in a single ad group.

 

Personally I will prefer to have different match types in different ad groups, mainly because of three reasons.

 

1. As each match type is in different ad groups, ad group level negative keywords can be implemented. This will prevent one match type cannibalizing another match type because of ad rank variations.

 

2. As each match type is in different ad groups, it is very easy to monitor the performance and implement a bidding strategy to utilize the full advantage of match types (for example bid more for exact match then phrase and modified broad match).

 

3. Based on match type I can write different type of ad copies for each ad group. For example very specific ad copies for my exact match ad group and bit more generic ad copies for my modified broad match keywords.

 

But this method will increase the number of ad groups in your campaign. So starting this method with few of your best performing keywords or ad groups, and then expand it will be a good idea.

 

Just a thought,

 

Deepak

Re: What would be the benefit?

[ Edited ]
Explorer ✭ ☆ ☆
# 4
Explorer ✭ ☆ ☆

There's been a lot of back and forth on multiple match types in the same adgroup but my feeling is that it's best to separate them into different adgroups because it offers more granularity of control and presumably more relevancy.

 

Including all match types in the same group can ease workload a bit but it may put an advertiser at a disadvantage because relevancy may suffer. By using different adgroups you can be more specific and hence more relevant with your ad copy.

Marked as Best Answer.
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Accepted by topic author Monikaji
September 2015

Re: What would be the benefit?

Top Contributor
# 5
Top Contributor

I would say that no matter the structure you set, you should bid higher on exact match; and minimum on broad match. (And in between for phrase match) - The logic is clear: when a search query matches exactly your keyword, that means that this is the product /ervice the user is looking for, and you want your ad to rank higher.

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
Did you find any helpful responses or answers to your query? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer’

Re: What would be the benefit?

Top Contributor
# 6
Top Contributor

I'll just throw my 2 cents in as well!

 

While having different match types in different Groups may be desirable, it may not be practical in some cases.  If you have 6 or 10 Ad Groups it won't be a problem, but if you have 15,000, do you really want to make that 45,000 just for a possible additional control?

 

As has already been said, you wouldn't normally keep simple Broad matches beyond an initial period of "discovery" (unless the word itself is very very rare, e.g. a part number) so I'd be reluctant to put Broads into their own Group anyway.

 

Jon

AdWords Top Contributor Google+ Profile | Partner Profile | AdWords Audits

Re: What would be the benefit?

Top Contributor
# 7
Top Contributor

It should be easier to get better QS for exact match keywords than for phrase or borad match - mainly for the reasons outlined in the earler replies - but as Jon points out you may sometimes make a lot more work for a small return differential. I would only do this with a few of the "star" keywords.

 

I find that a good number of my clients get the lion's share of their business from a pretty tight set of core keywords, and whilst it would be great to get a few of those long tail keywords that the gurus talk about, I have found these to be very few and far between.... of course as you move away from your core keywords you start to compete with people for whom these very words are at their core.

 

And if you do decide to separate the keywords into ad groups by match type remember to use the other match types as negatives in each group so as to force the choice.

Re: What would be the benefit?

[ Edited ]
Top Contributor
# 8
Top Contributor

I'd like to add my 2 cents to this, if I may Smiley Happy.

 

What I do, most of the times, is add all three: exact, phrase, modified broad where I lock one/two/X terms which are compulsory, for instance +samsung +led +tv.

 

Of course, I have [samsung 42" led tv] and "samsung 42" led tv" and [samsung 42 led tv], [samsung 47" led tv] and their phrase matches as well. But I cannot think of all the variations, and then I say: if it has panasonic and led and tv in it, or close variations, I need it. (I used a second brand so you don't think I'm doing any under the table marketing here Smiley Happy ).

 

Sometimes, if I see I'm paying too much for phrase or broad, I change their bids to a fraction of exact, so that I don't pay too much, especially for broad. But I need it there, as a discovery keyword.

 

This setup is easier to work with, because it does not triplicate the ad groups, but you still need to visit it frequently in order to place negatives or to promote search terms to keywords. But then you have to do the same in the three ad groups per theme one.

 

And whatever setup you use, the only ads which are going to be spot on, unless you use DKI, are going to be the ones triggered by exact matches. All the other are going to be "approximate". Regardless of the setup.

 

One word of advice: for tight budgets, it's better to start with exact only, wait for the QS to increase and then when you add the phrase and broad variation of those exact matches keyword, they'll have exactly the same QS as the exact match.

 

If you place them all at the same time, their QS will eventually be the same, but for the initial period you will pay more for the same clicks.

 

Let's say you really want #3 for an ad group. You start with a QS of 6 for your exact match, and it goes to 7 relatively quickly, while phrase stays at 6 and broad at 5. You need an ad rank of 21 to get to #3, last ad on the top.

 

It'll take you 3 days, and roughly 200 clicks, out of which 100 are for exact match, 70 for phrase and 30 for broad. Let's say you bid 5, just to make sure you get those top positions you really need. You'll pay approximately 300 for 100 clicks on exact match, 3.50 x 70 = 245 for those 70 on exact and 4.20 x 30 = 126 for those 30 on broad. Total = 671. At this point, your QS becomes 10, because the CTR you got for exact match was good, and all the other variations also have a QS of 10 from now on.

 

If you wait a bit, and start with exact, it'll take you the same amount of time to get those 100 clicks and get your QS to 10, and you'll pay those 300 to get there. Enter phrase and broad, at QS 10, not 6 and 5. For the next three days you need to get 100 more clicks from phrase and broad, you'll only pay 2.10 per click to get that ad rank of 21. Total = 300 + 210 = 510, and 161 stay in your pocket for willing to wait.

 

Of course, CPC varies with every auction, the competition does not stay the same, etc. But you get the point. Starting very relevant and being a little patient (if you can afford to be patient), can save you some money.

Calin Sandici, AdWords Top Contributor | Find me on: Google+ | Twitter | LinkedIn | myBlog
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Re: What would be the benefit?

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 9
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Thanks for the reply everyone..But in the regard of above replies I have other confusion. Hope you will all help me out. As Stickleback and info both emphasize the thing that if I will go with separate ad groups by match type then I have to use other match types as negative in each group…

 

So what would be the main reason to do this and if I do the same then may be the negative keyword in another adgroup of same focused keyword that I am using in another adgroup will not allow to trigger the ads. For Instance, If I have adgroup of exact match with the keyword [web design company] and the same keyword if I use negative in the adgroup of broad match then may it will affect my ad to trigger? It can be happen or I am totally wrong. Please reply. Thanks in advance. Each and Every answer is appreciable..

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author Monikaji
September 2015

Re: What would be the benefit?

Top Contributor
# 10
Top Contributor

Using the negative match types across the ad groups is, as much as anything a failsafe-  it simply forces Google to trigger the ad from the most relevant ad group - which in the end will be the cheapest option - and - you get to write ad copy that most closely resonates with the search term...

 

Suppose your exact match is [blue widgets] and the search phrase is blue widgets. The ad would have Blue Widgets in the headline and probably in the display url. The landing page would be for blue widgets... probably going to get your best conversion rates with this approach.

 

Of course, there will be lots of people who search for something with "blue widgets" in the search term--- "where can I buy blue widgets" - "are blue widgets better than red widgets" and so on.

 

We proably don't want to write such a tightly targeted ad for this search term. And we'd probably find that a very tightly related landing page might not work quite so well across the board in this case.... but we'd still want this ad to trigger for the term blue widgets ahead of a search term such as  - where can I get widgets - where our modified broad keyword might be  blue +widgets

 

There are so many factors that determine which keyword triggers and ad that simply running each match type in it's own ad group might not result in the ideal situation... although it "should" - but using the negatives forces the situation. And it's easy to do using the AdWords Editor - it's basically copy - paste - select all - change match type.

 

As with all things - testing will tell you whether this makes a significant difference in your case.