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Structure account (attributes, keywords, levels)

Participant ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Participant ✭ ✭ ✭

Hi again

 

I´d really like to find some neat, general method for creating account structures. A little more sophisticated  and with more rules than AdWords ordinary "sort your ad groups by theme".

That´s not so easy, when the world is multi-dimensional.

 

Let´s say we´re gonna build an account from scratch. And we´re selling underwear, for women and men, and all sorts.

And as you know, underwear comes in different forms, sizes, shapes, brands, colours, qualities, prices, materials.... - the world is a manifold. And it ´s multi-dimensional: one pair of underwear can be "red - cotton - for men - tight - XL - expensive" at the same time. Another pair might be just that - but it´s green. Another pair can be just that - but it´s for women!

 

So how do you, in such a world, create your campaigns and ad groups to make the ad you want to be triggered by the keyword you want? How do you create an account that is as transparant and easy to find in as possible?
How do you make it scalable (because we all know from the beginning that we´re not creating a perfect account, but that we will change things continously)?

 

Do you build a really complex, thought out account from beginning? Or do start with just 1 campaign, a few ad group and 5 keywords in each?

Do you add lots of negatives from the beginning, to make sure "cheap red underwear women" isn´t triggered by keywords in your "red underwear women" instead of "cheap underwear women" ad group (or campaign)?

 

 

2 Expert replyverified_user
2 ACCEPTED SOLUTIONS

Accepted Solutions
Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by Mof (Google Employee)
September 2015

Re: Structure account (attributes, keywords, levels)

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Oh David.... Real challenges you are giving us lately Smiley Happy

 

I like big campaigns to be structured in a similar hierarchy to the website structure, so you can immediately see for any section of the site the equivalent / parallel campaign / ad-group on the account.

 

I would separate into two or more different campaigns at the campaign level: e.g men's and women's ( allowing future flexibility in budget and targeting later ). Or if you want a more "flat "pyramid" - you could go by brands.

 

As you suggested, I like to have the campaigns' concept / structure (first) drawn on paper. (Using a pencil and a drawing sheet - we talked about that ....) After the concept has been set, to run a pilot, adding campaigns / ad groups ONLY after testing. (My engineering background .... "Build gradually"....Smiley Happy)

 

-Moshe

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
Did you find any helpful responses or answers to your query? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer’

View solution in original post

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by Mof (Google Employee)
September 2015

Re: Structure account (attributes, keywords, levels)

[ Edited ]
Top Contributor
# 5
Top Contributor

I think it depends on the search volume, the budget and the work (its cost) you can afford to put into it.

 

If you have a decent enough budget, you can start with two main campaigns, men and women, and use more general search terms, some sort of broad modified catchall keywords, more general ads, and then, through search terms, go from there and expand in areas where you see a high demand.

 

If the budget is tight, and the client expects a higher ROI right from the beginning, and is willing to pay for an extensive research & setup, you can start with a diversified setup from day one, but be prepared to see that some smart ad groups and keyword combinations stay in the "Low search volume" for quite some time.

 

And remember that an ad such as:

 

High quality men underwear

Boxers, shorts, ....

Available in many colours

 

with sitelinks such as 

 

Red Boxers: XL - Green Boxers L - Pink Smiley Happy boxers M ...

 

can serve quite a large number of search queries.

 

Not to mention product extensions, if they're available in the country you're advertising for.

 

Of course, the "paranoid" set up is maybe

 

Campaigns:

 

Men Red Boxers

Men Blue Boxers

...

Men White Shorts

...

Women Red lace ...

 

all gender / colour combinations available, plus the more general campaigns, and references to the size in ad text and sitelinks (or viceversa, all combinations between gender and size and colours in ad text and sitelinks).

 

Or the "crazy" setup, with

 

Men Red Boxers XL

...

Women Chocolate Lace M

 

 

etc. (all combinations between gender, colour and size), each with sample products as sitelinks and product extensions.

And, of course, every gender, colour and size is a negative phrase match keyword in every campaign / ad group but the one it belongs to.

 

That takes patience, Excel, maybe a bit of programming and the AdWords editor. And the maintenance is also not quite easy, but it should yield the highest ROI, in my opinion (excluding management and setup fees). And you have the necessary granularity to be able to better judge the performance.

 

Now pick one Smiley Happy.

 

 

 

Calin Sandici, AdWords Top Contributor | Find me on: Google+ | Twitter | LinkedIn | myBlog
Was my response helpful? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer.’ Learn how here.

View solution in original post

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by Mof (Google Employee)
September 2015

Re: Structure account (attributes, keywords, levels)

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Oh David.... Real challenges you are giving us lately Smiley Happy

 

I like big campaigns to be structured in a similar hierarchy to the website structure, so you can immediately see for any section of the site the equivalent / parallel campaign / ad-group on the account.

 

I would separate into two or more different campaigns at the campaign level: e.g men's and women's ( allowing future flexibility in budget and targeting later ). Or if you want a more "flat "pyramid" - you could go by brands.

 

As you suggested, I like to have the campaigns' concept / structure (first) drawn on paper. (Using a pencil and a drawing sheet - we talked about that ....) After the concept has been set, to run a pilot, adding campaigns / ad groups ONLY after testing. (My engineering background .... "Build gradually"....Smiley Happy)

 

-Moshe

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
Did you find any helpful responses or answers to your query? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer’

Re: Structure account (attributes, keywords, levels)

Participant ✭ ✭ ✭
# 3
Participant ✭ ✭ ✭

Great Moshe!

 

But how do you handle attributes that are not excluding dichotomies (man-woman), but overlap and complement. Like colour and sizes.

Search query "green small lady trousers" should certainly be triggered by the "Lady trousers" campaign, but which ad group - green or small? And how do you make that decision, and when (when creating a new account, or later in, when stats are flowing in)?

Re: Structure account (attributes, keywords, levels)

Top Contributor
# 4
Top Contributor

I would set the ad groups by sizes (e.g small, M. L. XL, ) . Those are set and known in advance, and do not change, as happens with colors that change by fashion or by seasons.

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
Did you find any helpful responses or answers to your query? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer’
Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by Mof (Google Employee)
September 2015

Re: Structure account (attributes, keywords, levels)

[ Edited ]
Top Contributor
# 5
Top Contributor

I think it depends on the search volume, the budget and the work (its cost) you can afford to put into it.

 

If you have a decent enough budget, you can start with two main campaigns, men and women, and use more general search terms, some sort of broad modified catchall keywords, more general ads, and then, through search terms, go from there and expand in areas where you see a high demand.

 

If the budget is tight, and the client expects a higher ROI right from the beginning, and is willing to pay for an extensive research & setup, you can start with a diversified setup from day one, but be prepared to see that some smart ad groups and keyword combinations stay in the "Low search volume" for quite some time.

 

And remember that an ad such as:

 

High quality men underwear

Boxers, shorts, ....

Available in many colours

 

with sitelinks such as 

 

Red Boxers: XL - Green Boxers L - Pink Smiley Happy boxers M ...

 

can serve quite a large number of search queries.

 

Not to mention product extensions, if they're available in the country you're advertising for.

 

Of course, the "paranoid" set up is maybe

 

Campaigns:

 

Men Red Boxers

Men Blue Boxers

...

Men White Shorts

...

Women Red lace ...

 

all gender / colour combinations available, plus the more general campaigns, and references to the size in ad text and sitelinks (or viceversa, all combinations between gender and size and colours in ad text and sitelinks).

 

Or the "crazy" setup, with

 

Men Red Boxers XL

...

Women Chocolate Lace M

 

 

etc. (all combinations between gender, colour and size), each with sample products as sitelinks and product extensions.

And, of course, every gender, colour and size is a negative phrase match keyword in every campaign / ad group but the one it belongs to.

 

That takes patience, Excel, maybe a bit of programming and the AdWords editor. And the maintenance is also not quite easy, but it should yield the highest ROI, in my opinion (excluding management and setup fees). And you have the necessary granularity to be able to better judge the performance.

 

Now pick one Smiley Happy.

 

 

 

Calin Sandici, AdWords Top Contributor | Find me on: Google+ | Twitter | LinkedIn | myBlog
Was my response helpful? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer.’ Learn how here.

Re: Structure account (attributes, keywords, levels)

Participant ✭ ✭ ✭
# 6
Participant ✭ ✭ ✭

Thanks a lot of both of you.

 

I think I am more paranoid than crazy Smiley Very Happy and when I have the opportunity to build a large , complex account from scratch I devote some 15 hours for it and take the middle way with some 15 campaigns and 3-6 ad groups in each.

 

But, an account like that  can be very easy done, or... it can be rather difficult and hazardous. It all depends of the variety and complexity of the supply.

 

Personally I also experience that it´s not really the size in terms of amounts of ads, keywords, ad groups, campaigns, site links (etc) that usually is most challenging and demands most time (all that can often be fixed quickly with Excel and the Editor). It´s the complexity and the time of thinking it takes to set it all up that bothers me each time.

Did I forget something? Did I include too much/too little? What triggers what? ....

That makes me sleepless and can be create a paralysis.

 

But gosh you can save so much time and money if you make it all tight and neat and easy to analyze from the beginning. That is really tempting!

 

What I really hate is to inherit an account that is built not-so-well-and-not-so-bad. These are difficult to analyze and hard to get control of and often I just feel I should rebuild it from scratch because that would save hours of perhaps pointless analysis and get you in control quickly

Re: Structure account (attributes, keywords, levels)

Top Contributor
# 7
Top Contributor

<joking>

Ah, so some advertisers are like some programmers: instead of trying to understand and adapt to what the guys before them did they offer to rewrite it from scratch. Of course, all the bugs that were detected in the initial version will come back in the rewritten one, but then who cares? Smiley Happy

</joking>

Calin Sandici, AdWords Top Contributor | Find me on: Google+ | Twitter | LinkedIn | myBlog
Was my response helpful? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer.’ Learn how here.

Re: Structure account (attributes, keywords, levels)

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 8
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
One approach I'm taking, but way too soon to know if it is working:

Build your landing page first. The landing page describes one product or service, or a narrow range of related products. A campaign targets either one landing page, or a small group of landing pages.

If your business is seasonal, you may have separate campaigns by season. In this case the separation for landing pages is by ad group.

But I'm still new at this. Advice worth less than you paid for it. but I'd welcome other thoughts.

Re: Structure account (attributes, keywords, levels)

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 9
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Hi David,

 

You may find this case study from PPC Professionals helpful with your account structure questions.  

PPC Professionals explains the benefits of proper Adwords account structure in a case study featuring an e-commerce website using real examples and exemplifying their positive results. Find out how to reduce AdWords CPA by over 60% with Strategic Segmentation.

 

http://goo.gl/D09kpO

Re: Structure account (attributes, keywords, levels)

Community Manager
# 10
Community Manager

Hi Amber,

 

Please be cautious on the Community to adhere to our guidelines around self-promotion.