AdWords
3.1K members online now
3.1K members online now
Dive into advanced features like Remarketing, Flexible Bid Strategies, AdWords Editor, and AdWords Scripts
Guide Me
star_border
Reply

Situations where having the same keyword listed in different campaigns or ad groups may be helpful?

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

I know that all the AdWords tutorials advise against this because the keywords would be competing against each other.  But couldn't this be used as a way to experiment?  

 

For example one could have same keyword in a campaign for display ads and the same keyword in a separate campaign for the search network.  Then one could see which network produces the better metrics such as the CTR, Conversions, or ROI.  If let's say that keyword is doing bad for the Display Network, one delete it from that network and just leave it on the Search Network therefore improving the QS of that specific keyword. 

 

Also if there is a benefit for using this same strategy for Ad Groups please let me know.

 

Thanks

2 ACCEPTED SOLUTIONS

Accepted Solutions
Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by Zee (Community Manager)
September 2015

Re: Situations where having the same keyword listed in different campaigns or ad groups may be helpf

Badged Google Partner
# 2
Badged Google Partner

The same two keywords only "compete" with each other between campaigns, if those campaigns have overlapping settings. So the same keyword in a search only campaign and a display only campaign would not "compete" against each other, because you are targeting two seperate networks. You can have the same keywords in different search campaigns, targeted to different locations, and those keywords would not "compete" with each other, because they have no over lapping location targeting.

 

Targeting ads on the display network is different than search. You don't actually have to have any keywords for display network campaigns/adgroups. Keywords are just another form of targeting placements. As you are continuing to experiment with display targeting, you may want to explore topic, interest based targeting, or managed placements as well.

 

 

Tom

View solution in original post

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author dogtown
September 2015

Re: Situations where having the same keyword listed in different campaigns or ad groups may be helpf

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 3
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Hi dogtown,

 

Sounds like an intriguing idea, especially if you limit one to Display and one to Search.  However, it really does depend on your advertising goals.  If you're trying to draw users to your site to generate some of your own advertising revenue, then maybe it's a good idea.  However, if you are trying to get people to your website so that you can sell a product or service, then I would advise against it unless you are selling something with very, very broad consumer appeal...for instance, shampoo.  If you're selling a very specialized product that can legitimately use the same keywords as a product having broader consumer appeal, then you will probably find that you will get a ton of clickthroughs and impressions on the Display Network, albeit with a very low clickthrough rate, which will result in very, very little time spent on your website along with a very high bounce rate, and you can end up spending a lot of money for sub-marginal results.  On the other hand, if you have a carefully built campaign with well chosen negatives and a carefully targeted Audience, then the Display Network can yield acceptable results.  However, the Display Network can be a dangerous place for small businesses with limited budgets...don't know if that's your case, but it is certainly mine!

 

If you're relatively new to this, and your goal is to find out which keywords work better than others, or which ads work better than others, then I'd set up a manual experiment. First, determine what your goals are; e.g., visitor numbers, unique visitors, time on site, bounce rate, etc. Create narrow Campaigns--e.g., T-shirts, sport shirts, button down dress shirts, etc.--rather than broad campaigns such as "shirts" with narrower Ad Groups.  Start by running a single Ad in an Ad Group strictly on Google search without Search Partners.  Take a look at the results after a week, then refine your keywords (add negatives and more specific search types) and add an additional Ad or two.  When you do this, set the Ads to rotate evenly rather than letting AdWords decide for you which ones are likely to perform better.  Take a look at the results after another week, and refine again, all the while keeping in mind your original goals.  You may find that some of your ads are completely worthless, while others are giving you stellar performance.  Ditch the ones that aren't helping you achieve your real goals, even if some of the numbers look very nice.  After two or three weeks, you'll know which Ad/Keyword combinations work best, then give the Search Partners a try, and continue to check results and refine.  After you've got things working to your satisfaction, then give the Display Network a try if you want to.  If you have the capability (financially, technically, or otherwise), set up some conversion experiments.

 

I hope this helps and wasn't just a bunch of blather.  The advice I've given is based on my own experience with AdWords over the past six years, first with a decent sized business, and the past few years as a small business owner.

 

Good luck!

View solution in original post

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by Zee (Community Manager)
September 2015

Re: Situations where having the same keyword listed in different campaigns or ad groups may be helpf

Badged Google Partner
# 2
Badged Google Partner

The same two keywords only "compete" with each other between campaigns, if those campaigns have overlapping settings. So the same keyword in a search only campaign and a display only campaign would not "compete" against each other, because you are targeting two seperate networks. You can have the same keywords in different search campaigns, targeted to different locations, and those keywords would not "compete" with each other, because they have no over lapping location targeting.

 

Targeting ads on the display network is different than search. You don't actually have to have any keywords for display network campaigns/adgroups. Keywords are just another form of targeting placements. As you are continuing to experiment with display targeting, you may want to explore topic, interest based targeting, or managed placements as well.

 

 

Tom

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author dogtown
September 2015

Re: Situations where having the same keyword listed in different campaigns or ad groups may be helpf

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 3
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Hi dogtown,

 

Sounds like an intriguing idea, especially if you limit one to Display and one to Search.  However, it really does depend on your advertising goals.  If you're trying to draw users to your site to generate some of your own advertising revenue, then maybe it's a good idea.  However, if you are trying to get people to your website so that you can sell a product or service, then I would advise against it unless you are selling something with very, very broad consumer appeal...for instance, shampoo.  If you're selling a very specialized product that can legitimately use the same keywords as a product having broader consumer appeal, then you will probably find that you will get a ton of clickthroughs and impressions on the Display Network, albeit with a very low clickthrough rate, which will result in very, very little time spent on your website along with a very high bounce rate, and you can end up spending a lot of money for sub-marginal results.  On the other hand, if you have a carefully built campaign with well chosen negatives and a carefully targeted Audience, then the Display Network can yield acceptable results.  However, the Display Network can be a dangerous place for small businesses with limited budgets...don't know if that's your case, but it is certainly mine!

 

If you're relatively new to this, and your goal is to find out which keywords work better than others, or which ads work better than others, then I'd set up a manual experiment. First, determine what your goals are; e.g., visitor numbers, unique visitors, time on site, bounce rate, etc. Create narrow Campaigns--e.g., T-shirts, sport shirts, button down dress shirts, etc.--rather than broad campaigns such as "shirts" with narrower Ad Groups.  Start by running a single Ad in an Ad Group strictly on Google search without Search Partners.  Take a look at the results after a week, then refine your keywords (add negatives and more specific search types) and add an additional Ad or two.  When you do this, set the Ads to rotate evenly rather than letting AdWords decide for you which ones are likely to perform better.  Take a look at the results after another week, and refine again, all the while keeping in mind your original goals.  You may find that some of your ads are completely worthless, while others are giving you stellar performance.  Ditch the ones that aren't helping you achieve your real goals, even if some of the numbers look very nice.  After two or three weeks, you'll know which Ad/Keyword combinations work best, then give the Search Partners a try, and continue to check results and refine.  After you've got things working to your satisfaction, then give the Display Network a try if you want to.  If you have the capability (financially, technically, or otherwise), set up some conversion experiments.

 

I hope this helps and wasn't just a bunch of blather.  The advice I've given is based on my own experience with AdWords over the past six years, first with a decent sized business, and the past few years as a small business owner.

 

Good luck!