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Should our company purchase API?

Explorer ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Explorer ✭ ✭ ✭

Recently, our company was invited to start a strategic partnership with Google AdWords Premier SMB Program.

API was recommended to easily manage large portfolio. Please educate me further what is an API? I only know it by the "book" (Help Center), since it is part of the certification question.If we are about to handle 200 accounts/month, does this number ring a bell to purchase API? What functionalities do Adwords Editor missed which might be supported by API instead?

More Power,
Loraine
2 Expert replyverified_user
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Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by MosheTLV (Top Contributor)
September 2015

Re: Should our company purchase API?

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Hello LoraineQuiaoit,

 

The AdWords API is a tool to help advertisers simplify and quicken their management of accounts by building applications which work directly with the AdWords interface. You need to consider what you could use the API for and whether it would be beneficial for your own situation of managing 200 accounts. 

 

If one of your accounts was large for example you could cut down a lot of work and time using the API to quickly generate any number of ads. If another account is product based you have the ability to intergrate your AdWords account with the stock database to ensure you only advertise what is actually available for purchase or to push items that are on sale at that time. There is also the option to create your own custom reports exactly how and when you want them to the extent everything is automated.

 

There are so many possibilies but you just have to decide whether any of them would truly be helpful to you, it's also worth noting that you'll need someone with development experience to actually work with the API.


ScottyD, AdWords Top Contributor
Was my response helpful? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer.’ Learn how here.

View solution in original post

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by MosheTLV (Top Contributor)
September 2015

Re: Should our company purchase API?

Collaborator ✭ ☆ ☆
# 3
Collaborator ✭ ☆ ☆

We use the API more for the reporting side of things rather than for making large scale changes to the client accounts.

 

Our clients have an area on our site they can log into and see custom reporting for their AdWords accounts. 

 

There are a lot of ways that you can integrate your systems with the AdWords API but as you have been chosen as a Premier SMB Partner, you should be able to get some advice from one of the AdWords technical advocates

 

Have a look through this AdWords API area and it will give you a better understanding of how you could use it to your advantage.

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Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by ScottyD (Top Contributor)
September 2015

Re: Should our company purchase API?

Google Employee
# 4
Google Employee

Hi Loraine,

 

Since you asked "what is an API", I thought I'd throw out a bit of really basic information on what it is and how it works.  Scott and purefuzz may have been assuming that you knew this part already.

 

API stands for "application programming interface".  The AdWords API lets you -- or someone you hire -- write computer programs ("applications") that manipulate your AdWords account and download reporting data.  You can write programs that do simple things like add and remove keywords and ads, upload a huge list of keywords or ads at once, and so on.

 

A lot of really big advertisers (online shopping and auction sites, etc.) use the API to automate the massive volume of ads they create.  They'll write a program that looks at every entry in their product database, extracts the interesting words from them, and uploads them as keywords with bids that are based on the products' prices.  When they're out of stock on an item, their program will delete or pause the keywords and ads for that item.  Or they can mine the logs on their own site to see what people were searching for, then use those terms as keywords for their ads.  The possibilities are almost endless.

 

We also have some shadier advertisers using the API to upload huge quantities of ads.  A few months ago we had one guy create about 3 million sleazy dating ads all at once.  I was the lucky one who got to review them. (To be clear, I don't have a big problem with adult dating ads as long as they're not derogatory, and as long as I don't have to look at all of them.  But millions of them from one advertiser was a bit much.  A few thousand would probably have been more than enough.)

 

You can also get almost arbitrarily fancy, e.g. download stats for all of your keywords, do some number crunching, and then tweak the bids on some of the keywords based on your calculations.  In some ways, this is like the automation / scripting feature in the AdWords UI, but on steroids.  (Perfectly legal steroids that do not violate AdWords policies. :-)

 

All of this can be a lot of work for the advertiser, but less work than doing it all by hand.  Some of our biggest advertisers have whole departments of people who write custom API clients to integrate with their databases.  If your company doesn't want to write and maintain that code, I think there are also some third parties out there that will sell you software that manages your account via the API.  The pages that purefuzz linked to should have some information on that if it exists.

 

Laura

View solution in original post

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by MosheTLV (Top Contributor)
September 2015

Re: Should our company purchase API?

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Hello LoraineQuiaoit,

 

The AdWords API is a tool to help advertisers simplify and quicken their management of accounts by building applications which work directly with the AdWords interface. You need to consider what you could use the API for and whether it would be beneficial for your own situation of managing 200 accounts. 

 

If one of your accounts was large for example you could cut down a lot of work and time using the API to quickly generate any number of ads. If another account is product based you have the ability to intergrate your AdWords account with the stock database to ensure you only advertise what is actually available for purchase or to push items that are on sale at that time. There is also the option to create your own custom reports exactly how and when you want them to the extent everything is automated.

 

There are so many possibilies but you just have to decide whether any of them would truly be helpful to you, it's also worth noting that you'll need someone with development experience to actually work with the API.


ScottyD, AdWords Top Contributor
Was my response helpful? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer.’ Learn how here.
Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by MosheTLV (Top Contributor)
September 2015

Re: Should our company purchase API?

Collaborator ✭ ☆ ☆
# 3
Collaborator ✭ ☆ ☆

We use the API more for the reporting side of things rather than for making large scale changes to the client accounts.

 

Our clients have an area on our site they can log into and see custom reporting for their AdWords accounts. 

 

There are a lot of ways that you can integrate your systems with the AdWords API but as you have been chosen as a Premier SMB Partner, you should be able to get some advice from one of the AdWords technical advocates

 

Have a look through this AdWords API area and it will give you a better understanding of how you could use it to your advantage.

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by ScottyD (Top Contributor)
September 2015

Re: Should our company purchase API?

Google Employee
# 4
Google Employee

Hi Loraine,

 

Since you asked "what is an API", I thought I'd throw out a bit of really basic information on what it is and how it works.  Scott and purefuzz may have been assuming that you knew this part already.

 

API stands for "application programming interface".  The AdWords API lets you -- or someone you hire -- write computer programs ("applications") that manipulate your AdWords account and download reporting data.  You can write programs that do simple things like add and remove keywords and ads, upload a huge list of keywords or ads at once, and so on.

 

A lot of really big advertisers (online shopping and auction sites, etc.) use the API to automate the massive volume of ads they create.  They'll write a program that looks at every entry in their product database, extracts the interesting words from them, and uploads them as keywords with bids that are based on the products' prices.  When they're out of stock on an item, their program will delete or pause the keywords and ads for that item.  Or they can mine the logs on their own site to see what people were searching for, then use those terms as keywords for their ads.  The possibilities are almost endless.

 

We also have some shadier advertisers using the API to upload huge quantities of ads.  A few months ago we had one guy create about 3 million sleazy dating ads all at once.  I was the lucky one who got to review them. (To be clear, I don't have a big problem with adult dating ads as long as they're not derogatory, and as long as I don't have to look at all of them.  But millions of them from one advertiser was a bit much.  A few thousand would probably have been more than enough.)

 

You can also get almost arbitrarily fancy, e.g. download stats for all of your keywords, do some number crunching, and then tweak the bids on some of the keywords based on your calculations.  In some ways, this is like the automation / scripting feature in the AdWords UI, but on steroids.  (Perfectly legal steroids that do not violate AdWords policies. :-)

 

All of this can be a lot of work for the advertiser, but less work than doing it all by hand.  Some of our biggest advertisers have whole departments of people who write custom API clients to integrate with their databases.  If your company doesn't want to write and maintain that code, I think there are also some third parties out there that will sell you software that manages your account via the API.  The pages that purefuzz linked to should have some information on that if it exists.

 

Laura