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Scope of related searches & relevant variations in broad match

[ Edited ]
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

I happened upon this article which suggests that a broad match keyword for "red flowers" would match the queries "red" and "flowers". Checking the AdWords Help for broad match did not add clarity.

 

My understanding from reading Google's description is that one of two things must be true for a broad match to occur:

 

  1. ALL words in the keyword--adjusted for stemming, plurals, etc.--must be present in the query, OR
  2. The query must be a relevant variation or a related search of ALL words from the keyword.

The first choice obviously doesn't work for either "red" or "flowers" and it's hard for me to see how "red" can be considered a related variation or a related search for "red flowers".

 

I wonder whether the automatic generalization to "flowers" is allowed under broad match without BMM on "red"?

 

As for "red" matching, is the article incorrect or is there something else going on here?

 

Thanks,
Sim

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Marked as Best Answer.
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Accepted by topic author Simeon S
September 2015

Re: Scope of related searches & relevant variations in broad m

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 10
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I talked to AdWords Support and you are right, it is "any or all". So, red flowers will be considered a match for "red blood cells" but its QS would be low and that's why it won't show.

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Re: Scope of related searches & relevant variations in broad m

Collaborator ✭ ✭ ✭
# 2
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Hello,

 

For this to happen "ALL words in the keyword--adjusted for stemming, plurals, etc.--must be present in the query, " , you have to be using a broad match modified keyword such as

 

+red +flowers

 

Also the BMM ( broad match modified) keyword can match a search term if all words from it (the keyword) are present in the search term in any order so even [flowers which are red] can match a +red +flowers keyword.

 

There is also the "simple broad match" which indded only requires the query to have at least 1 word from the keyword , in order to match the keyword with the query.

 

About this question 

 

"I wonder whether the automatic generalization to "flowers" is allowed under broad match without BMM on "red"?"

 

Unfortunately I do not understand what you mean, could you come up with an example pair of search term and keyword ?

 

 

Re: Scope of related searches & relevant variations in broad m

[ Edited ]
Collaborator ✭ ✭ ✭
# 3
Collaborator ✭ ✭ ✭

And regarding the title, the differences between the "broad match modifier" and the "simple broad match" keywords are the fact that the "simple broad match" can match search terms which represent synonims and "related searches" . That article you are mentioning is very old (2011) , read better from here to understand the differences :

 

http://www.google.ro/ads/innovations/bmm.html

 

https://support.google.com/adwords/answer/2497702?hl=en&ref_topic=3122868

Re: Scope of related searches & relevant variations in broad m

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 4
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
Adrian, I know what BMM does. The question was not about simple vs. modified broad match. It was specifically about the behavior of simple broad match.

In case my question was not specific-enough, consider the simple broad match keyword "red flowers" and tell me whether it will match the query "red". If you think it does match, would it do so because of term matching rules related to simple broad match or because "red" is considered a synonym or a related search for "red flowers"?

Re: Scope of related searches & relevant variations in broad m

Collaborator ✭ ✭ ✭
# 5
Collaborator ✭ ✭ ✭
Yes the keyword red flowers (written without quotation marks, in order to be a simple broad) , will match the search term red , because a simple broad keyword can match a search term if any of its words is in the search term.

This 2 words keyword can also match red wine or blue flowers.

This matching did not happen because of the synonims or related searches rule.

An example of a related search match would be the search term red tulips.

You can test all these scenarios with the Ad Preview Tool which will show you exactly what keyword triggered a search term.

Re: Scope of related searches & relevant variations in broad m

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 6
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
Well, Adrian, I just set up a campaign with a single ad group with a single broad match keyword: red flowers and tested your claim in the preview tool. I can get the ad to show for the queries "red flowers" and "red flower". It does not show for "red" or "flowers". It does not even show for "crimson flowers" or "scarlet flowers". So, something is not right with what you claim... If you create the same campaign, would they show for you?

Can you point me to content authored by Google which says that a broad match keyword would match of query if any terms match?

Logically, it would be strange if the simple broad match keyword red flowers matched the queries "red blood cell", "blood red sunrise" or "red food coloring", no? Especially since Google did not launch AdWords with BMM back in 2000 so advertisers would have had no way to protect against these types of irrelevant matches.

Re: Scope of related searches & relevant variations in broad m

Collaborator ✭ ✭ ✭
# 7
Collaborator ✭ ✭ ✭

I could be wrong, as per the documentation it says here if you expand "broad match"

 

https://support.google.com/adwords/answer/2497836?hl=en

 

"With broad match, your ad may show if a search term contains your keyword terms in any order, and possibly along with other terms."

 

However , practice has taught me a different story this single word match it does not happen for every combination, only for what the system finds as relevant. I support my claim with 2 issues.

 

1) My search terms report indicates this, for example why did here the search term recruitment of models match the keyword recruitment company (a translation for the words you see in my language, romanian)

 

Or in the second example recruitment for the energy industry matched also recruitment company, just the word recruitment was present in both search term and keyword.

 

search-terms-report1.png

 

2) If you look at the examples they give in the documentation here

 

https://support.google.com/adwords/answer/2497828?hl=en

 

low-carb diet plan  matches carb-free foods

 

How is the match done between diet plan and foods ? I doubt they are synonims.

Re: Scope of related searches & relevant variations in broad m

[ Edited ]
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 8
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

I would argue that these matches fall in the category of "related variations," to quote Google. In other words, they are not term-based. My hypothesis is that term-based matching requires ALL terms (stemmed, etc.) and that any variation from that must either be a synonym or a related search/variation.

It would be nice to have an official opinion from a Google employee on this question as it is clear that the documentation is confusing.

Re: Scope of related searches & relevant variations in broad m

Collaborator ✭ ✭ ✭
# 9
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Yes it is confusing as I remember that the help center in the past claimed "any or all" words from the simple broad could be in the search term, just like it says in that article, but now the words "any or all" are missing from the descriptive phrase.

 

The person who wrote that article in 2011 , Bethany Bay is also active in this forum, you can ask her your self . Here is the thread where you can comment on her personal presentation :

 

https://www.en.adwords-community.com/t5/From-the-Community-Team/AdWords-Community-Spotlight-Neha-amp...

 

To get an answer from google directly I would try the chat line found here

 

https://support.google.com/adwords/answer/8206?hl=en&hlrm=en

 

Just click on "Chat Now" and "Start a chat" .

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author Simeon S
September 2015

Re: Scope of related searches & relevant variations in broad m

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 10
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
I talked to AdWords Support and you are right, it is "any or all". So, red flowers will be considered a match for "red blood cells" but its QS would be low and that's why it won't show.