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Rearranging keywords. Does it matter?

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Here is an example:

 

"toronto real estate" vs "real estate toronto"

 

When I input those two sets of keywords in to Google Traffic Estimator, different CPC projections are given, despite the exact four keywords. ("real estate toronto" is a cheaper bid)

 

Question #1:  Should I just target the cheaper combination?

 

Now my guess is that far more people search "toronto real estate" than "real estate toronto".  Maybe as much as a 4:1 ratio.  So...

 

Question #2:  If someone Googles "toronto real estate", will my ads show up if I bid on "real estate toronto"?

 

Thanks very much for any feedback you can give.  These forums are very helpful.

 

And yes, I sell real estate in Toronto.

Smiley Very Happy

 

 

 

 

2 Expert replyverified_user
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Marked as Best Answer.
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Accepted by Zee (Community Manager)
September 2015

Re: Rearranging keywords. Does it matter?

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Hi GetStephen,

 

I would recommend using both, at least for a while, and carefully monitor the data. It may turn out the more expensive keyword produces a better conversion rate and a better ROI. One of the great parts of AdWords is you can test things easily and make you decisions basedon gathered data rather than guessing at what might work.

 

Let's look at your examples:

"toronto real estate"

"real estate toronto"

 

You have these in quotes, which would normally indicate phrase match. With phrase match, a user query of "toronto real estate" would not trigger your keyword "real estate toronto", When you use phrase match, the words must appear in the same order.

 

I hope you're not asking about broad match. That's a whole different thing. Let's look at just your first keyword and see what happens: Broad match--toronto real estate.

 

With broad match, any one of the words in your keyphrase can trigger your ad. Thus, a query of "Toronto" could trigger your ad, a query of "real player" could trigger your ad, a query of "estate planning toronto" could trigger your ad.

 

I normally go with modified broad rather than broad: +real +estate +toronto.  This means all three words, in any order, must be included in the query for that keyword to trigger your ad. Aha, you say, so this will catch both "toronto real estate" and "real estate toronto", and you would be correct. The difference being that you might get a better QS for the query "toronto real estate" if your keyword were (modified broad match) +toronto +real +estate, as it is a closer match to the query. This means the ad would have a lower CPC because of the higher QS.

 

Now, let's talk about targeting for a moment. If you target your campaign at Toronto, with targeting set to "include search intent", you would need to include Toronto in any of your keywords, no matter the match type. That all happens magically from Googles end. It makes managing keywords a whole lot simpler.

 

Group your keywords and ads by theme. Let's say you handle different types of real estate--income property, residential property, and commecial property. Make these three separate ad groups in your campaign, with the ad copy and the landing pages targeted at the separate areas of business.

 

Best of Luck!

 

Pete

 

 

petebardo -- Deadhead doing AdWords

View solution in original post

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by Zee (Community Manager)
September 2015

Re: Rearranging keywords. Does it matter?

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Hi GetStephen,

 

I would recommend using both, at least for a while, and carefully monitor the data. It may turn out the more expensive keyword produces a better conversion rate and a better ROI. One of the great parts of AdWords is you can test things easily and make you decisions basedon gathered data rather than guessing at what might work.

 

Let's look at your examples:

"toronto real estate"

"real estate toronto"

 

You have these in quotes, which would normally indicate phrase match. With phrase match, a user query of "toronto real estate" would not trigger your keyword "real estate toronto", When you use phrase match, the words must appear in the same order.

 

I hope you're not asking about broad match. That's a whole different thing. Let's look at just your first keyword and see what happens: Broad match--toronto real estate.

 

With broad match, any one of the words in your keyphrase can trigger your ad. Thus, a query of "Toronto" could trigger your ad, a query of "real player" could trigger your ad, a query of "estate planning toronto" could trigger your ad.

 

I normally go with modified broad rather than broad: +real +estate +toronto.  This means all three words, in any order, must be included in the query for that keyword to trigger your ad. Aha, you say, so this will catch both "toronto real estate" and "real estate toronto", and you would be correct. The difference being that you might get a better QS for the query "toronto real estate" if your keyword were (modified broad match) +toronto +real +estate, as it is a closer match to the query. This means the ad would have a lower CPC because of the higher QS.

 

Now, let's talk about targeting for a moment. If you target your campaign at Toronto, with targeting set to "include search intent", you would need to include Toronto in any of your keywords, no matter the match type. That all happens magically from Googles end. It makes managing keywords a whole lot simpler.

 

Group your keywords and ads by theme. Let's say you handle different types of real estate--income property, residential property, and commecial property. Make these three separate ad groups in your campaign, with the ad copy and the landing pages targeted at the separate areas of business.

 

Best of Luck!

 

Pete

 

 

petebardo -- Deadhead doing AdWords

Re: Rearranging keywords. Does it matter?

Top Contributor
# 3
Top Contributor

Hi GetStephen,

 

This is a very important question. Short answer is YES!!  Keywords and variations matter quite a bit.

 

The answers to both of your questions are completely dependent on the selected match type on the keywords. 

 

My suggestion to you would be to take a look at some documentation on Keyword Match Types.

 

If by "toronto real estate" and "real estate toronto" you are referring to using these keywords with a Phrase match type, they are two completely different keywords and both would be likely to make it into one of my ad groups, if I sold real estate in toronto. Smiley Happy

 

There are many previous similar questions that have been asked here and answered with great suggestions and in great detail.  Try performing a search here on the community

 

If you have any further questions, please don't hesitate to ask. 

 

-Tom

Tommy Sands, AdWords Top Contributor | Community Profile | Twitter | Philly Marketing Labs
Did you find any helpful responses or answers to your query? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer.’

Re: Rearranging keywords. Does it matter?

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 4
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Thanks very much, both of you for your wonderful advice.  Tonight, I will educate myself even further by implementing your ideas.

 

However...I may be back!

Smiley Wink

Re: Rearranging keywords. Does it matter?

Badged Google Partner
# 5
Badged Google Partner

That was a fantastic response Pete!

 

"income property, residential property, and commecial property" may be three completely different kinds of users. One may be more likely to search for 'realestate', and another 'real estate'. "Now my guess is that far more people search "toronto real estate" than "real estate toronto".  Maybe as much as a 4:1 ratio." Even if one keyword generates four times the impressions, the other keyword may generate more conversions. 

 

I think Pete's strategy is right on. Try the modified broad match single keyword term (+real +estate +toronto), then check your search terms report, to find the most profitable search terms, and irrelavent search quieries to add as negative keywords. If you have a conversion strategy in place, then you will know which keywords to focus on. 

 

http://support.google.com/adwords/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=108218

Click More about the search terms report to see how it works...

Tom