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Quality (?) Score

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

My client is a personal trainer offering a fitness bootcamp.  One of her keywords is "fitness".

 

Her ad features "Fitness" in the headline

The keyword "fitness" is mentioned 11+ times on her landing page

Max CPC is set at $6.00; Avg CPC so far is $5.31

The leading keyword in impressions and clicks is "fitness".

 

The Quality Score has dropped steadily over the past several days from 7 to 2.  No, check that, it has now dropped to 1 since I started this post.  

 

"1"?!  

 

What the "1"?!  

1 Expert replyverified_user
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Marked as Best Answer.
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Accepted by Eric (Google Employee)
September 2015

Re: Quality Score ingredients

Top Contributor
# 3
Top Contributor

Hello 949local;

 

I strongly recommend you to read an excellent discussion posted yesterday, by Google's AdWords performance specialist. on "Ingredients of the Quality Score sauce"

 

One of the pints he raised is :

  • First, the relevance of a keyword is not entirely determined by its presence on the landing page or the number of times it's been mentioned on the landing page. It’s not about how appropriate we find the keyword to the product/landing page but how appropriate the users find it. In other words, the number of users clicking on your ad when they search for that keyword.


-Moshe

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
Did you find any helpful responses or answers to your query? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer’

View solution in original post

Re: Quality (?) Score

Collaborator ✭ ☆ ☆
# 2
Collaborator ✭ ☆ ☆

Fitness is an extremely generic term and it would be very hard to provide every user a good experience using this keyword as it covers so many things.

 

fitness equipment

mens fitness

fitness magazines

fitness plans

fitness classes

fitness clubs

 

How does your CTR look on this keyword?

 

I don't think it matters how many times you have fitness mentioned on the page and ad etc when we are talking about such a generic term.

 

I'd imagine you would want to go for more specific terms to ensure a better ROI

 

Think about Ad Groups like Fitness classes/programs/bootcamp/sessions etc.

 

Fitness bootcamps itself has a reasonable search volume.

 

I hope this helps a little.

 

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by Eric (Google Employee)
September 2015

Re: Quality Score ingredients

Top Contributor
# 3
Top Contributor

Hello 949local;

 

I strongly recommend you to read an excellent discussion posted yesterday, by Google's AdWords performance specialist. on "Ingredients of the Quality Score sauce"

 

One of the pints he raised is :

  • First, the relevance of a keyword is not entirely determined by its presence on the landing page or the number of times it's been mentioned on the landing page. It’s not about how appropriate we find the keyword to the product/landing page but how appropriate the users find it. In other words, the number of users clicking on your ad when they search for that keyword.


-Moshe

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
Did you find any helpful responses or answers to your query? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer’

Re: Quality (?) Score

Participant ✭ ☆ ☆
# 4
Participant ✭ ☆ ☆

You might end up finding that you want to negate the exact match:

 

-[fitness]

 

BTW, when you say the keyword is "fitness" how do you actually have it entered in the ad group?  IOW, what's the match type?  Is it:

 

fitness

"fitness"

+fitness

[fitness]

 

If it's not the last one, then be sure to check your search term reports on a regular basis and add negatives, as needed.