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A Few Newbie questions

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Hi all,

 

I am PPC newbie and I studied few blogs regarding keywords research. BUT I still dont understand few things:

 

  1. I found keyword with high search volume and low competition. If I put low max CPC into Google Traffic Estimator it doesn’t show me any result. Result appeared only at high CPCs. If I try to search this keyword in Google, no ads displayed. What does it mean and should I put low or high CPC?
  2. I also found opposite case: as I tried to search for long tail words appropriate keywords had low search volume but high competition. What should I do? Bid higher or try to find another long tail words?
  3. What If have keyword which is not being searched at all? I suppose I will set low max CPC?  
  4. Is there any way how to find out what keywords – and maybe max.CPC – have my competitors paid?

 

Thank you all for your help in advance!

 

With kind regards,

 

Bob

1 Expert replyverified_user
2 ACCEPTED SOLUTIONS

Accepted Solutions
Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by Zee (Community Manager)
September 2015

Re: A Few Newbie questions

Follower ✭ ☆ ☆
# 2
Follower ✭ ☆ ☆

I only use the estimator for ideas, not for anything set in stone. I have found that if you start with a higher CPC than what you ultimately want to spend and then lower it after a day or two, you gain a better QS during that time and your keyword performs better overall. All keywords need a few days to really give you any idea of how they are going to work for you. Your QS and ad rank will also depend on your landing page. If your page has poor content, you will need to pay more for the word. 

As for the keywords that are not being searched at all, Google will not show these words unless they are searched more often. Doesn't matter what you bid, they won't show it until it has an increased search volume. I was told by a Google rep that they do not release the information on exactly how many times it needs to be searched to show up. 

I know I did not answer a couple of your questions, but I really only had info on these two. Hope this helps. 

View solution in original post

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author carwaycz
September 2015

Re: A Few Newbie questions

Top Contributor Alumni
# 4
Top Contributor Alumni

Good morning - 

 

Some additional thoughts:

 

1. A keyword that shows no clicks at a low bid is one, as you guess, that's going to cost you more to advertise on. Also, searching on Google directly is not going to provide you with really reliable results. Many factors--your location, the geotargeting of competing campaigns, your browser settings, day of the week, time of the day, match types, etc.--affect what you see on the search results page. You not seeing an ad doesn't mean competition doesn't exist.

 

2. Keywords with high competition tend to be ones that other advertisers are finding successful for them. You can, yes, search for different long-tail keywords but stop and think for a minute--what matters more to you, bidding low or bidding on keywords that your potential customers actually search on?  

 

3. If you try a keyword that isn't being searched at all, the bid you offer won't matter. It will be tagged for low search volume and be inactive to trigger ads until such time (if it arrives) as Google decides to add the keyword to the search advertising database.

 

4. There are many tools online--some free and some paid--that claim to offer competitve keyword research. You can easily find these tools by searching for them using your favorite search engine. 

 

Good luck!

 


Theresa
Google AdWords Top Contributor
*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*

View solution in original post

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by Zee (Community Manager)
September 2015

Re: A Few Newbie questions

Follower ✭ ☆ ☆
# 2
Follower ✭ ☆ ☆

I only use the estimator for ideas, not for anything set in stone. I have found that if you start with a higher CPC than what you ultimately want to spend and then lower it after a day or two, you gain a better QS during that time and your keyword performs better overall. All keywords need a few days to really give you any idea of how they are going to work for you. Your QS and ad rank will also depend on your landing page. If your page has poor content, you will need to pay more for the word. 

As for the keywords that are not being searched at all, Google will not show these words unless they are searched more often. Doesn't matter what you bid, they won't show it until it has an increased search volume. I was told by a Google rep that they do not release the information on exactly how many times it needs to be searched to show up. 

I know I did not answer a couple of your questions, but I really only had info on these two. Hope this helps. 

Re: A Few Newbie questions

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 3
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
Thank you very much, it really helped! Cheers, Bob
Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author carwaycz
September 2015

Re: A Few Newbie questions

Top Contributor Alumni
# 4
Top Contributor Alumni

Good morning - 

 

Some additional thoughts:

 

1. A keyword that shows no clicks at a low bid is one, as you guess, that's going to cost you more to advertise on. Also, searching on Google directly is not going to provide you with really reliable results. Many factors--your location, the geotargeting of competing campaigns, your browser settings, day of the week, time of the day, match types, etc.--affect what you see on the search results page. You not seeing an ad doesn't mean competition doesn't exist.

 

2. Keywords with high competition tend to be ones that other advertisers are finding successful for them. You can, yes, search for different long-tail keywords but stop and think for a minute--what matters more to you, bidding low or bidding on keywords that your potential customers actually search on?  

 

3. If you try a keyword that isn't being searched at all, the bid you offer won't matter. It will be tagged for low search volume and be inactive to trigger ads until such time (if it arrives) as Google decides to add the keyword to the search advertising database.

 

4. There are many tools online--some free and some paid--that claim to offer competitve keyword research. You can easily find these tools by searching for them using your favorite search engine. 

 

Good luck!

 


Theresa
Google AdWords Top Contributor
*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*

Re: A Few Newbie questions

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 5
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Thank you very much!