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understanding Adwords referrer info

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Hi

Our click log system recordes referrer info of search clicks like:

http://www.google.com.au/aclk?sa=l&ai=CMyapm7aKT6_5HemoiQf6-ZCWC7u4qY8C2-eUvy__m9ctCAAQASDB1v8OKANQ2...

 

From it we can see query parameters "sa" ,"ai" and "sig". ai and sig parameters include encoded info. Could some one help me to understand those parameters?

 

 

 

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Accepted by Zee (Community Manager)
September 2015

Re: understanding Adwords referrer info

Top Contributor
# 3
Top Contributor

Hi cwu2006,

 

It looks like Panjak has misunderstood your question. I'm afraid I can't help you much with that either as I do not know the exact meaning of these parameters. With the advent of secure Google search, any query executed with https will return encrypted data about that query. That may be what you're looking at here.

 

If you are looking to gather data on the keyword(s) that trigger your ad, you can use the {keyword} value in your destination URL If you are using the referrer data to identify AdWords traffic, that is the most unreliable method of doing so. Instead, look for the presence of a gclid value in the query string.

 

Best of Luck!

 

Pete

 

petebardo -- Deadhead doing AdWords

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Re: understanding Adwords referrer info

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Hi cwu2006,

 

I am not sure about your 3rd party tracking tool, but just in case if you have auto tagging enabled for the Adwords account, then as per my understanding, your web logs should contain URLs like www.example.com/?gclid=123xyz, where gclid denotes that click originated from Adwords and later this information is send across to the Google Analytics which records other important metrics inside the account (It is subject to the condition that Adwords and Analytics are properly linked and you have auto tagging turned on).

 

My advise would be to get in touch with your 3rd party tool administrators who have created these URLs for you.

 

Pankaj

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by Zee (Community Manager)
September 2015

Re: understanding Adwords referrer info

Top Contributor
# 3
Top Contributor

Hi cwu2006,

 

It looks like Panjak has misunderstood your question. I'm afraid I can't help you much with that either as I do not know the exact meaning of these parameters. With the advent of secure Google search, any query executed with https will return encrypted data about that query. That may be what you're looking at here.

 

If you are looking to gather data on the keyword(s) that trigger your ad, you can use the {keyword} value in your destination URL If you are using the referrer data to identify AdWords traffic, that is the most unreliable method of doing so. Instead, look for the presence of a gclid value in the query string.

 

Best of Luck!

 

Pete

 

petebardo -- Deadhead doing AdWords

Re: understanding Adwords referrer info

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 4
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

thanks for info, the reason i am asking that is because i wish adwords put some unique info in the referrer string to identify if the ads were triggered by keyword search not by page reloading.

Re: understanding Adwords referrer info

Participant ✭ ☆ ☆
# 5
Participant ✭ ☆ ☆

You can't look at the referring URL in isolation when analyzing PPC traffic.  You have to analyze the combination of the URL requested from your server and the referring URL.  The gclid is unique - generated each time an ad is clicked, but that is appended to your destination URL (the requested URL) not the referring URL.

Re: understanding Adwords referrer info

Participant ✭ ☆ ☆
# 6
Participant ✭ ☆ ☆

P.S. This might help:

 

http://www.mattcutts.com/blog/better-click-tracking-with-auto-tagging/

 

That's from the blog of a Googler who works on the organic side of search but is relevant to the paid side.