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"Search terms" report almost empty?

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

I'm definitely not an expert here, I've only used AdWords when I've needed to sell a house. It seems to be doing what I want at the moment. But I wanted to see what people were actually searching for, so I tried Reports -> Pre-defined reports -> Basic -> Search terms. I changed to "Last 30 days" which includes my whole campaign. (Is there any way to make that the default?) It shows only two terms, half of my clicks, and 2 of 34 impressions. Every other report I've tried shows all 34 impressions. All the filter terms to the left side are set to "All". Whatever can this mean?

 

If it worked, the next thing I'd want would be to see the associated keywords. I see lots of posts here about doing just that - but they all seem to be referring to an older version of AdWords. I don't see any way to add Keyword to this report. Is there a way?

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author Loren A
November 2016

"Search terms" report almost empty?

[ Edited ]
Participant ✭ ✭ ☆
# 2
Participant ✭ ✭ ☆

Did you try just going to the keyword tab, then clicking on "Search Terms" (right below, and slightly to the left of the "Keywords" tab)? Making sure your date range is set right first, of course.

 

Once you get that page displayed, you will be able to add the keywords using Column>Modify Columns>Attributes>Keyword.

 

When a campaign is first started, it often takes half a day or longer for search terms to start reporting; there is a delay. 

 

34 impressions is unusually small.  Is this a tightly geo-targeted campaign?

 

I suspect that search terms haven't started reporting yet, because the impression volume is so low.  But it's just a hunch.

Re: "Search terms" report almost empty?

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 3
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Steve,

 

You might want to start with the "Campaigns" heading before suggesting the "Keyword" tab for us beginners. When I found that, and clicked on the Search terms button, they appeared instantly! But only the same two... At least there is an explanation button:

AdWords Search term - insignificant.png

 

So most of my action is in the dreaded "Other search terms" black hole. All I've seen here is that there is nothing to be done about that. True?

 

In the Reports section, they don't provide the "Other" line, nor the explanation:

AdWords Search term Report.png

 

My campaign has been up since September, but it is definitely targeted, to one CA county and one specific feature of the house I'm selling. At over $8 per some of the keywords, I'm not comfortable extending it very far! I don't really understand why the quotes are so high, when there doesn't seem to be any competition and I get first or second place every time it works.

 

Both clicks you see above are useless, guess I need some negative keywords, like "rent" - I'm definitely "sell". But when the rest are invisible, what can I do other than stay low profile? I seriously doubt many locals up here are blocking their referrer, so I suppose they just think the searches are too unpopular.

 

Thanks for pointing me to the conclusion, better to understand what's going on!

 

Loren

"Search terms" report almost empty?

[ Edited ]
Participant ✭ ✭ ☆
# 4
Participant ✭ ✭ ☆

Running a unique, speciality campaign can be a challenge even for AdWords veterans so I give you credit for the valliant effort!

 

Many real estate campaigns use 'rent' as a negative keyword, because there is so much traffic looking for rentals. Sounds like you are on the right track with that. 

 

I don't know what your match types or keywords are, but they would have to be chosen very carefully to run such a tightly geo-targeted campaign on a small budget.  I suspect your impression volume is likely just too low to catch the attention of Google's algorithms for collecting and reporting search terms.  

 

You might want to consider using modified broad match search terms, using the + markers on the words within the keyword which absolutely MUST be included.  I don't know what you're advertising but just as a hypothetical that might look like:

 

mother +in +law +unit

+in +law +suite

 

This will filter out some of the "too broad" matches that you will likely get when using broad match.  But keep in mind it may lower your impression volume further.  

 

Hard to comment further since it is unknown what you are marketing.  This is a public web forum, well indexed, so we understandSmiley Happy

 

hth

 

 

"Search terms" report almost empty?

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 5
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Steve,

 

Appreciate the clues! No secrets here, I'm trying to sell this house. It is set up with an optional in-law unit, and the official listing used "in-law quarters" which in general gets way fewer hits than some of the other terms. So I picked 14 of the ones that generally get more action and set up this campaign.

 

I left them at "Broad match", but put the first batch in double-quotes - "in-law unit"...  A second batch is not in quotes, and seems to get more impressions, despite "granny unit" showing 100x fewer hits than "in-law unit" in general search results. So I suspect the quotes do require the exact phrase. And I assume "In-law" and "In law" are equivalent?

 

Would +in +law +unit have some different effect?

 

The one I can't explain is the one I grabbed from the suggestions -

homes for sale with inlaw apartment

Which has zero impressions, despite lots (for me) of "in-law..." impressions.  Plus it is under $5 when they want $8.83 for "in-law apartment". Maybe "inlaw" is not equivalent to "in-law" and "in law"?

 

In general search "inlaw unit" gets the same 65MM results, with the "Did you mean: in law unit" query but obviously showing all the hyphenated versions already. (But no spaced versions! Searching explicitly for the space version finds one hit that the run together version doesn't.)

 

Dare we assume AdWords works like general search?

"Search terms" report almost empty?

[ Edited ]
Participant ✭ ✭ ☆
# 6
Participant ✭ ✭ ☆

You cannot mix match types.  It's either broad match, modified broad match, phrase match, or exact match:

 

house for sale

+house +for +sale  (any word can leave off the +; those with it are required to match)

"house for sale"

[house for sale]

 

You cannot just "stick in" a phrase match in the middle of a broad match keyword; it is all or nothing. 

 

The hypen within in-law will be treated as a space.  Hyphens are null characters within a keyword. 

So... "in-law" should behave the same as "in law". 

 

in law   is a 2-word keyword, whereas inlaw is a different, 1 word keyword.  Misspellings like that are often used as keywords because they are spelled wrong frequently by searches and can be a "long tail" bargain of sorts.

 

AdWords does not work like general search because it is an auction for paid search results and the advertiser is controlling, to some degree, what the search terms are matched with and there are a sharply limited number of search results (plus a number of other reasons).  Organic search results reflect Google search, but not the PPC ads. Not that Google search queries aren't useful for various things when working on campaigns. 

 

hth. I may have missed a thing or two, the hour is late and the day was longSmiley Happy

 

 

 

 

 

 

"Search terms" report almost empty?

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 7
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Steve,

 

One again, thanks!

 

So are you saying that even though the setting in the match column still says "broad match", if I put the whole phrase in double quotes it becomes a "phrase match"? (Somehow I suspect it isn't quite that simple...) Is it better to switch the setting than use the quotes?

 

If I used  +house +for +sale  all must be present, in any order, but others may be inserted or added, right? While "house for sale" requires them in that order but allows other words before or after them?

And if I used square brackets it wouldn't match a search with any additional words?

 

BTW...  Does everyone get three identical copies of each of the eMail notifications from this system?

 

Loren

 

"Search terms" report almost empty?

Participant ✭ ✭ ☆
# 8
Participant ✭ ✭ ☆

Loren, I'm not sure how Google behaves when you put quotes in a broad match keyword, since I've never done that.  There are probably people reading this thread who would know.  My guess is Google does one of two things:  1) ignore the keyword, or 2)treat the " as literally, part of the keyword text.  Either way, it is likely to mess you up.  It might interpret it as phrase match, but I'd be surprised. Especially if it's for only part of the keyword.  A new one for my list of "what does Google do" questionsSmiley Wink

 

Yes, if you use +house +for +sale all must be present, but in any order and there could be more words in the matched search term. 

 

"house for sale" (without anything else) is a phrase match keyword and the words must be in exactly that order.  There could be other words before or after it, in the search term. 

 

[house for sale] matches exactly to that.

 

For both phrase and exact match, they will match to minute' variations e.g. plural vs singular.  Google "match types Adwords" and read the Google documentation for the exact specifics - but it is only very minor variations. 

 

No, you should only get one email notification. Have you logged in and followed questions while logged into different Google accounts?

 

hth

 

 

Re: "Search terms" report almost empty?

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 9
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Steve,

 

I just learned something. When you select one of your keywords and Edit -> Match types, the choices they show you do not reveal the current match type! Apparently they always show Broad as selected, and Phrase as the default new target. I was thinking that because I had never changed any match types there, mine were all somehow set to Broad - despite my use of double quotes.

 

But I did a report, and though is does not show the double quotes in the report, if you compare it to the screenshot of the Keywords screen you can see it is picking up the effect of the double quotes:

 

AdWords Keywords Type Compare.jpg

 

(I filtered for only the current campaign, but somehow it included a couple of old terms on the right half...)

 

So I'm pretty sure I understand now - adding quotes does change the type setting, you don't need to formally edit the type name.

 

I found several Google pages that didn't help much, and this one which is the best of the lot but still leaves a bunch of uncertainty about what exactly the system will do:

https://support.google.com/adwords/answer/2497836?hl=en

-----

we'll show your ads for close variations of your phrase and exact match keywords to maximize the potential for your ads to show on relevant searches. Close variations include misspellings, singular forms, plural forms, acronyms, stemmings (such as floor and flooring), abbreviations, and accents. So there's no need to separately add close variations as keywords.

For example, if your phrase match keyword is "kid's scooter," you'd still want to show your ad when someone searches for "kids scooter" or "kid scooters."

Keep in mind that even though we show close variations of your phrase and exact match keywords, these match types still give you more control than broad match. That's because broad match keywords also show for synonyms and related searches, which aren't considered close variations.

-----

 

So we decided "in-law" was equal to "in law", and that seems to say it would be equal to "inlaw". Guess I should try the test page... 

 

My AdWords account is a separate Google account for private stuff and payments. I login here with my public Google account and I don't believe this site even knows about the private account. All three notifications appear together on the public eMail. I never use the private account for forums or the like. Strange.

 

Loren

 

"Search terms" report almost empty?

Participant ✭ ✭ ☆
# 10
Participant ✭ ✭ ☆

I'm not surprised Google picked up the double quote as an indication it's a phrase match. 

 

Inlaw might be matched the same as in law.  Sometimes Google considers missing spaces as grammatical errors and still matches them. You'll see it happening as you start to follow your search term reports, if you add the "Keyword" column you'll quickly spot when it happens.