AdWords
5.2K members online now
5.2K members online now
Use AdWords conversion tracking and reporting to measure your results. Have a question about Google Analytics? Post it here, on the Google Analytics Community!
Guide Me
star_border
Reply

Why do you put Top Performing keywords in separate campaigns?

Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆
# 1
Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆

Ive noticed that some PPC professionals group Top Performing keywords in seperate campaigns and I just wanted to know the thought process behind it?  Is it that other non performing keywords dont lower the quality score, does it have something to do with impression share?

PPCSophie
1 Expert replyverified_user
1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions
Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author PPCSophie
September 2015

Re: Why do you put Top Performing keywords in separate campaigns?

Badged Google Partner
# 3
Badged Google Partner

Impression share metrics aren't much of a concern anymore with the new impression share columns at the adgroup level, but there was a time when (some?) impression share metrics were only available at the campaign level (or am I mis-remembering that?).

 

However, there are still some options which are only available at the campaign level. Once you find your top revenue generating terms, then putting them into their own campaign can further help you improve ROI by using all the tools available (only) at the campaign level. Advanced campaigns adds some more adgroup level options formerly only available at the campaign level (and takes some away), - So, in some cases the reasons for creating a new campaign may soon be irrelevant, but...

 

Some of the campaign only options that have not changed, are the bidding method, ad rotation, and ad delivery. Once you have found those KW/ad combinations that generate the greatest return - (ex.) Using CPA bidding, rotate for conversions, and accelerated delivery (if you have the budget), may further improve ROI.

 

Using those same options for unprofitable, or not as profitable campaigns might do much more harm than good. You always have to allocate some budget to experimenting as time goes on, but mixing exploration and ROI strategies within the same campaign can be a mess. Not to mention the fact that you can't control total daily budget at the adgroup level, even with advanced campaigns. You want most of your budget going to what "works", and the best (IMO) way to control the ad buy is at the campaign level.

 

I hope my response was in no way contradictory to yours Lakatos. Smiley Happy If so then it's Sr.'s fault - After all, he's the one who taught me this strategy. Smiley Wink

Tom

View solution in original post

Re: Why do you put Top Performing keywords in separate campaigns?

[ Edited ]
Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Hi Sophie,

 

Yep, that's a bit the QS, but not the IS. Most importantly it's comfortable to have good keywords you don't need to worry about in a separate campaign whereby budget, schedule, geo etc. control can also be separated.

 

You can regard the other campaign as an incubator for experimental keywords: with limited budget, schedule and/or geo.

 

Best,

Lakatos

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author PPCSophie
September 2015

Re: Why do you put Top Performing keywords in separate campaigns?

Badged Google Partner
# 3
Badged Google Partner

Impression share metrics aren't much of a concern anymore with the new impression share columns at the adgroup level, but there was a time when (some?) impression share metrics were only available at the campaign level (or am I mis-remembering that?).

 

However, there are still some options which are only available at the campaign level. Once you find your top revenue generating terms, then putting them into their own campaign can further help you improve ROI by using all the tools available (only) at the campaign level. Advanced campaigns adds some more adgroup level options formerly only available at the campaign level (and takes some away), - So, in some cases the reasons for creating a new campaign may soon be irrelevant, but...

 

Some of the campaign only options that have not changed, are the bidding method, ad rotation, and ad delivery. Once you have found those KW/ad combinations that generate the greatest return - (ex.) Using CPA bidding, rotate for conversions, and accelerated delivery (if you have the budget), may further improve ROI.

 

Using those same options for unprofitable, or not as profitable campaigns might do much more harm than good. You always have to allocate some budget to experimenting as time goes on, but mixing exploration and ROI strategies within the same campaign can be a mess. Not to mention the fact that you can't control total daily budget at the adgroup level, even with advanced campaigns. You want most of your budget going to what "works", and the best (IMO) way to control the ad buy is at the campaign level.

 

I hope my response was in no way contradictory to yours Lakatos. Smiley Happy If so then it's Sr.'s fault - After all, he's the one who taught me this strategy. Smiley Wink

Tom

Re: Why do you put Top Performing keywords in separate campaigns?

[ Edited ]
Top Contributor
# 4
Top Contributor

I don't think so, Tom. Just that  - while I only mentioned a few arguments - your answer was much more exhaustive....Smiley LOL

Re: Why do you put Top Performing keywords in separate campaigns?

Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆
# 5
Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆
Thank you very much. That helped a lot!
PPCSophie

Re: Why do you put Top Performing keywords in separate campaigns?

Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆
# 6
Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆
Thank you very much you both were on target but your explanation was really helpful as well especially the last paragraph. Thank you!
PPCSophie