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Google AdWords and Google Analytics conversion tracking

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Hi there,

 

I have two questions regarding the conversion tracking of AdWords and Analytics:

 

 

1) If people click AdWords ad and return within 30 days with cookie still present and converted, will adWords attribute the conversion to the click regardless of the channel (organic, email, or referral, etc.) the visitor return through?

2).Since Google Analytics adopts the Last Non-Direct Click model by default, does that mean that any conversions contributed by new visitors who typed the url directly and converted will NOT be recorded by GA?

 

Could anybody help me with this? I'd appreciate it!

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Accepted by topic author TAI A
September 2015

Re: Google AdWords and Google Analytics conversion tracking

Top Contributor
# 4
Top Contributor
Hi Tai A,

That is correct. AdWords will credit the AdWords click for the conversion no matter how that person returns to complete the conversion.

I'm not sure you are correct about the Google Analytics attribution. If the user return via email, and you have not added manual tracking to the email link, and if it's not something like gmail where you use your browser to read the mail, the source should be direct. If the user open the email with Thunderbird, where the email is downloaded to the user's computer, that should show up as direct. If the user uses a browser-based email solution, then the referrer data should show.

AdWords will attribute the conversion to the ad click, no matter how the user returns to complete the conversion.

Best of Luck!

Pete
petebardo -- Deadhead doing AdWords

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Re: Google AdWords and Google Analytics conversion tracking

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor
Hi TAI A,

1) Correct, AdWords will attribute to the AdWords campaign/adGroup/Ad/keyword on the date of the original click.

2) I'm a little confused by you question. New visitors who typed in the URL directly and converted WILL be recorded, but with a "direct" source. If this is a returning visitor who had previously clicked on your add within the last 30 days, the conversion will be recorded and attributed to AdWords if the user has not returned to your site through another source. As you correctly stated, "Google Analytics adopts the Last Non-Direct Click model by default".

I hope this helps.

Best of Luck!

Pete
petebardo -- Deadhead doing AdWords

Re: Google AdWords and Google Analytics conversion tracking

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 3
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
Thank you Pete!

For the first question, did you mean that the original click on AdWords will get the credit even if the visitor who clicked the AdWords ad return via an email campaign within 30 days? I know in this case Google Analytics will attribute the conversion to email/referral instead of google/ppc but am still not quite sure how the AdWords attribution mechanism works.

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author TAI A
September 2015

Re: Google AdWords and Google Analytics conversion tracking

Top Contributor
# 4
Top Contributor
Hi Tai A,

That is correct. AdWords will credit the AdWords click for the conversion no matter how that person returns to complete the conversion.

I'm not sure you are correct about the Google Analytics attribution. If the user return via email, and you have not added manual tracking to the email link, and if it's not something like gmail where you use your browser to read the mail, the source should be direct. If the user open the email with Thunderbird, where the email is downloaded to the user's computer, that should show up as direct. If the user uses a browser-based email solution, then the referrer data should show.

AdWords will attribute the conversion to the ad click, no matter how the user returns to complete the conversion.

Best of Luck!

Pete
petebardo -- Deadhead doing AdWords