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Conflict Keywords problem

[ Edited ]
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Hi,

i hope you can help me...

 

i have 2 ad group in 1 campaign for example:

 

test [Exact] - only Exact keywords

test "phrase" - only phrase keywords

both ad group have the same keywords just with different match type...

 


lets say the keyword is "car"

 

adword give me this error when i click the speech bubble on test "phrase" ad group:

 

This keyword is triggering other ads with a similar keyword:[car] > Campaign> test [Exact]

but if i click on the speech bubble on test [Exact] ad group everything is ok...

 

 

 

so i read here a lot and i found out that if i put Negative keywords on test "phrase" ad group like [car] so it will show both add group

 

but if i do that i get a new error

A negative keyword ([car]) is preventing your ad from showing.

 

 

so what is wrong?

 

 

Thanks

 

 

 

2 Expert replyverified_user

Re: Conflict Keywords problem

[ Edited ]
Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆
# 2
Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆

Hey Ori,

 

I had the same problem with my keywords because best practices suggest that this is a great idea (idea being to negative out the Exact match on Phrase match keywords) to maximize on keywords.

 

I would also get the same error message even though I would still receive impressions & clicks for the keyword.  I believe Adwords is just picking up that it is the same keyword text but it will still impress for that phrase match keyword.  I wasnt comfortable with the error message so I just stopped doing it, even though I still got clicks, impressions, conversions for the keyword. 

 

My suggestion would be to run the keyword for a couple of day and if it is not getting any metrics then try using other negative keywords http://www.ppchero.com/it-might-be-time-to-revisit-your-accounts-structure/.  Also here is an article explaining in more detail the segmenting you describe, here is an exerpt from the article:

 

These days, we at PPC Hero have really taken to creating Ad Group variants for each Match Type while utilizing embedded negatives to tightly control your traffic.   For the above account, you’d do something like this for the “General Cookies” campaign:

  • Cookies General (Exact), containing only Exact Match keywords.
  • Cookies General (Phrase), containing only Phrase Match keywords, and Negative Exact Matches of every keyword.
  • Cookies General (Broad/Modified Broad), containing only Broad/Modified Broad Match keywords, along with Negative Exact and Negative Phrase Matches of every keyword.

Hope this helps!

 

 

PPCSophie

Re: Conflict Keywords problem

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 3
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
Thanks!

Re: Conflict Keywords problem

Top Contributor
# 4
Top Contributor

Hello Ori Gold;

 

If I got your answer correctly the keywords  are competing;

 

The keyword that will match the search query and will trigger the ad, will  be the one with the more restrictive match type or the one with the higher as-rank; (depending on the scenario)

 

Read the following article that fully explains what happens when several keywords match the search query;

 

http://support.google.com/adwords/answer/2756257?hl=en

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
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Accepted by topic author Ori Gold
September 2015

Re: Conflict Keywords problem

Top Contributor
# 5
Top Contributor

Hi Ori Gold;

 

I don't think either of these answers explain what is going on. You are actually getting exactly what you wnated when you set it up.

 

The QS and the info in the speech bubble are based on the exact match. So when you hover of the speech bubble in the phrase group, it considers the query as "cars". In that case, the exact match group should be getting the impression, because that is what you asked the system to do.

 

Instead, go to the ad preview and diagnostic tool. If the phrase match term "cars" is included in the query with other words, the phrase match keyword should be eliglible for an impression. It's then up to the competiion and your AdRank if your ad shows.

 

Search query: "cars"

Keyword Triggered: [cars]  -- exact match

 

Search query: "Blue cars"

Keywords Triggered: "cars" -- phrase match.

 

Best of Luck!

 

Pete

petebardo -- Deadhead doing AdWords

Re: Conflict Keywords problem

Top Contributor
# 6
Top Contributor

@Pete;

"This keyword is triggering other ads with a similar keyword:[car] > Campaign> test [Exact]"

 

Why are you saying that the "exact" [cars] is not competing with "phrase" "cars" - and the "exact" wins?

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
Did you find any helpful responses or answers to your query? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer’

Re: Conflict Keywords problem

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# 7
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Perfect answer petebardo.... Thanks! Smiley Happy
Marked as Best Answer.
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Accepted by MosheTLV (Top Contributor)
September 2015

Re: Conflict Keywords problem

Top Contributor
# 8
Top Contributor

Hi MosheTLV,

 

I am not exactly saying they do not compete. Under certain circumstances, they could compete, but not in the sense that they would drive the cost up for either.

 

What I am saying is the speech bubble tool only considers the exact keyword as entered, just as the QS shown in the interface is based on the exact keyword. If you have broad, phrase and exact match all for the same keyword, the speech bubble tool in most cases will indicate the more restrictive match type wins. AdRank falls in here somewhere along the line. If the AdRank of the phrase match is higher than the AdRank of the exact, the phrase match would get the impressions. When Google says the more restrictive match type is selected, they are assuming you have bid higher on the exact match. We learned this at one of the summits. If bids for phrase and exact are equal, the exact should get the impression as well. If the bid for exact is lower than the bid for phrase, the phrase match should get the impression. Google just doesn't think anyone would do that.

 

If we have "cars" and [cars] both, the speech bubble will tell you the messages as shown. But that doesn't mean the phrase match isn't doing it's job. It does mean the speech bubble is limited in what it can do. It's ok for a quick review, but in cases like this the Ad Preview and Diagnostics tool will give you more accurate results. In this group or campaign, a query of cars would trigger the exact match, while red cars would trigger the phrase match. If a query of cars the Ad Preview tool showed the phrase match as triggering, I would think that would be a problem, unless that was the intention of the advertiser as expressed by bidding lower on the exact match than the phrase match.

 

Make sense?

 

Pete

 

 

 

petebardo -- Deadhead doing AdWords

Re: Conflict Keywords problem

Top Contributor
# 9
Top Contributor

Hi Pete;

OK ; Got it;

 

  • When Google says the more restrictive match type is selected, they are assuming you have bid higher on the exact match. - I agree
  • If bids for phrase and exact are equal, the exact should get the impression as well -I also agree

  • If the bid for exact is lower than the bid for a phrase, the phrase match should get the impression. - Never seen cases like that, but according to the help center - "exact" (still) should win. (Regardless of the Ad-rank.  Quote:If you have multiple keywords that are the same, the system will prefer to use the keyword with the more restrictive keyword match type.)

-Moshe

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
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Accepted by MosheTLV (Top Contributor)
September 2015

Re: Conflict Keywords problem

Top Contributor
# 10
Top Contributor

Hi MosheTLV,

 

Ok, let me modify my statement about when the phrase match has a higher bid than the exact match--the phrase match could get the impression.

 

We have seen evidence of this when campaigns split ad groups by match type. If you don't include negative phrase and exact match for the same keyword in the broad match group, the broad match term often gets the impression and shows the broad match ad rather than the ad for the exact match. There a plenty of posts here asking about how that happens when the more restrictive match type should have received the impression. The advice is pretty much the same each time-add negatives for phrase and exact match to the broad match group.

 

The same thing can happen when broad, phrase and exact match are all in the same ad group.  When we asked the Google engineers the question f how this could happen, the answer was they assumed you would bid higher for the more restrictive match types. The help center article appears to make the same assumption. So, what if you find an exact match term that converts well, but at a lower rate than the phrase or broad match? If you don't want to block the exact match all together, the only option here would be to add it as negative exact to the group where the broad or phrase match keyword is and place it in a separate ad group with a lower bid.

 

None of this was the point of my post here. I was trying to outline the differences in the way the speech bubble analyses the keyword and to point out the better way to find out if the keyword is showing is to use the Ad Preview Tool. The Speech bubble will always tell you the exact match keyword gets the impressions for the same keyword in phrase or broad match or BMM.

 

Interesting discussion, MoshTLV. Thanks for the challenge.

 

Pete

 

petebardo -- Deadhead doing AdWords