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Understand Google's advertising policies, including ad approval status and account suspension
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Question regarding wording of ad

Top Contributor
# 1
Top Contributor

A competitor is targeting a client's business name via search network and running almost identical ad copy.

The ad copy that they are running isnt a concern as such.

 

However would the wording in the following line of text be permissible in a text ad?

 

Don't be fooled by our competition!

 

Thanks
Whims Smiley Happy

Bronwyn Vourtis, Google Analytics Top Contributor
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Re: Question regarding wording of ad

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Hi Whims;

Hmmm....  a very nice question:

In my view it is a violation of the Advertiser claims section :

 

All advertising claims must be factually supportable.

http://support.google.com/adwordspolicy/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=1331529&topic=1310871&ctx=topic

 

 

So, this your competitor claiming that "you are fooling" - must be supported by an evidence / a real example/ a test on the landing page.

 

My thoughts....

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
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Re: Question regarding wording of ad

Top Contributor
# 3
Top Contributor

Gday Smiley HappySmiley Happy

 

No i was wondering if the client could possibly come back with a counter ad for just their own branded keywords that the competitor(s) is targeting

 

That line was for the clients ad

 

just for example (line characters havent been counted)

 

Client Company Name

5 Star Ratings. 15yrs Experience.
Don't be fooled by our competitors.

www.blahblah.com

 

or 

 

Client Company Name

5 Star Ratings. 15yrs Experience.
Don't be duped by competitor ads.

www.blahblah.com

 

(and yes, the ratings are backed up by a link to the 3rd party independant ratings page etc)

 

Thanks

Whims

Bronwyn Vourtis, Google Analytics Top Contributor
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Re: Question regarding wording of ad

Top Contributor
# 4
Top Contributor

I wouldn't try to advertise a "counter ad": - that is (in my view ) too risky, if ad-copy is found in violation of the Policy In that case, you can find your ad being disapproved.

I would report the competitor.

 

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
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Re: Question regarding wording of ad

Top Contributor
# 5
Top Contributor

Hi Whims,

 

Perhaps you could work the positive spin in your clients ads vs playing their game.

 

Sometimes using terms like 'official' and 'original' can accomplish the same.  I'm with Moshe, I wouldn't go after the competitors...keep the customers in mind here.  You're ratings are great and should be able to speak for you.

 

Just a thought.

 

-Tom

 

Tommy Sands, AdWords Top Contributor | Community Profile | Twitter | Philly Marketing Labs
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Re: Question regarding wording of ad

Top Contributor
# 6
Top Contributor

Thanks for your thoughts everyone :-))

 

I agree, I would prefer to put a positive spin on it however the client was pretty adamant about what they wanted in terms of an ad however at least now i can inform them that afaik it is against ad policy re the suggested wording

 

Thank You :-))

Bronwyn Vourtis, Google Analytics Top Contributor
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Re: Question regarding wording of ad

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# 7
Top Contributor

Hi Again,

 

If we're looking at the wording of an ad, I would say that the only thing you would be up against would be an ad disapproval.  I can't see why you couldn't try to submit an ad anyway you wish and simply backtrack if it would be disapproved.

 

Sure, this isn't among 'best practices' but IMO, the only real way to determine what is acceptable in situations like this is to give it a shot. Smiley Happy

 

-Tom

Tommy Sands, AdWords Top Contributor | Community Profile | Twitter | Philly Marketing Labs
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Re: Question regarding wording of ad

Google Employee
# 8
Google Employee

Hi Whims,

 

I agree with Tom -- give it a shot.  I don't think you'd be violating any policies with those ads, though I'm not sure how wise it is to "go negative".  Even if there is a policy against this that I'm not aware of, you can just delete the disapproved ad and move on.

 

This sort of "you can't use that wording" disapproval wouldn't cause any suspension issues as far as I know.  We tend to reserve that for repeat attempts to advertise banned products and for attempts to trick our systems by cloaking, playing tricks with text in the ad to get around our rules, etc.

 

Laura

AdWords engineer

Re: Question regarding wording of ad

Top Contributor
# 9
Top Contributor

@Laura;

Isn't he risking himself getting into a scenario of an account suspension, (in the event of ) / due to multiple ads being disapproved?

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
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Re: Question regarding wording of ad

Google Employee
# 10
Google Employee

Hi Moshe,

 

As far as I know, only certain types of disapprovals contribute to suspensions.  It's generally the "egregious" ones, for example

  • Trying to advertise products that just aren't allowed: steriods, tobacco, prescription drugs without a license, counterfeit goods, etc.
  • Trying to game the system with creative misspellings, mixture of character sets, weird euphemisms like "juice" to describe e-cigarette supplies, etc.
  • "User safety" stuff.
  • "Cloaking", i.e. serving up one web page to Google and another to end users.

Other, more "editorial" policies are fairly unlikely to lead to suspensions, I think, and even if they did you'd get a warning first so you'd know not to do that again.

 

This might be a good topic for October.

 

Laura