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Products that facilitate drug use now OK?

[ Edited ]
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# 1
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This post is going to be about Vaporizers in general and how Google allows advertisers to promote devices which preliminary function is to facilitate recreational drug use under the guise of 'aromatherapy'.

 

First off, there are two types of vaporizers. There are vaporizers that in fact are made for aromatherapy that works like diffusers and produce vapor to be inhaled by NOSE. They work like this:

hhttp://www.abundanthealth4u.com/Diffuser_Comparison_s/52.htm

and they look like this:
http://diffuserworld.com/markets/store/vaporizing-diffusers.html

 

And then there are vaporizers made for facilitating recreational drug use that produce vapor to be inhaled by MOUTH in order to get the active ingredients from the herbal drugs into the bloodstream. They work like this:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vaporizer_(inhalation_device)

and look like this:
http://www.namastevapes.co.uk/collections/all-vaporizers

 

The difference between the two are that the legit vaporizers for aromatherapy actually heats up the herbal material and then dispense the vapor into the atmosphere while the vaporizers for drug facilitating use heats up the herbal material and then the user have to breath in the vapor orally from the device either by a mouthpiece of balloon (to induce the high).

 

It is easy to tell the difference between the two and if Google had any interest in enforcing their policy regarding "Products or services marketed as facilitating recreational drug use" they could easily distinguish it on the products themselves. Vaporizers for recreational drug use are closer to electronic cigarettes (another AdWords banned product) than they are to legit aromatherapy vaporizers.

 

What has happen is there are now companies like namastevapes.co.uk and vaporizor.com that have started advertising their drug facilitating vaporizers as 'aromatherapy' and by both misleading Google and their visitors they are now allowed to promote their stores via AdWords. It's like setting up a store selling hookahs and bongs, but then claim they are only meant to be used as vases.

 

I have reported these advertisers who sells vaporizers meant for drug use several times but they never seem to get put under scrutiny, or Google just doesn't care as long as everyone can pretend they are used for 'aromatherapy'. I also think it's quite humorous that there are no websites who sell vaporizers for drug use that actually advertise on the term "aromatherapy".

 

I have also reached out to the Googles AdWords team both via phone and chat, but the answer is different each time depending on the person answering. One day its 'This is against our policies. Report them and we will take action.' and other days it's "As long as they say it's for aromatherapy it's OK".

 

So Google you can't have it both ways. Either you enforce your policy against these advertisers clearly misleading both you and visitors that their products are for aromatherapy when their preliminary use is in fact to facilitate recreational drug use, or you should remove this part of your policy as it's not accurate/enforced.

 

All I want is an answer from someone on Google AdWords team who understands the differences between the two types of vaporizers why you allow advertisements for vaporizers facilitating drug use if you know that's what they are for?

2 Expert replyverified_user

Re: Products that facilitate drug use now OK?

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 2
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I totally agree with you. It is strange that a big company like Google really either does not know the difference between the products or what a vaporizer is for. No cannabisusers around there? Smiley Wink

 

Any attempt for saying that a vaporizer is for aromatherapy is pure bull**bleep** and it's good that you brought up the fact between smelling and breathing.

 

You don't breath in vaporized "eucalyptus" or "rosemary" lol. And specially when looking at all accessories which you can buy for the vaporizer, all those water tools. Whats the difference between them and a hookah?

A vaporizer + water tool = hookah/bong. It is just a convertor.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=9DP2YZiRSIQ#t=151

and watch at 3:38 what the vaporizer is doing. There you can see the popular Arizer Solo

 

But Google just want to sit there and ignore the facts. Any reason why?

Re: Products that facilitate drug use now OK?

[ Edited ]
Top Contributor
# 3
Top Contributor

Hi there;

Quote:

>>"What has happen is there are now companies like namastevapes.co.uk and vaporizor.com that have started advertising their drug facilitating vaporizers as 'aromatherapy' and by both misleading Google and their visitors they are now allowed to promote their stores via AdWords."

 

Could you link specific landing pages on these sites to demonstrate this claim?

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
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Re: Products that facilitate drug use now OK?

[ Edited ]
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# 4
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Hello!

Im sure all their landing pages are carefully worded and avoids mentioning what their products are actually for. If they weren't I assume they would have failed the AdWords reviews. Just like any headshop selling pipes and bongs list that they are for "Tobacco use only" sites like NamasteVapes and Vaporizor do the same thing only replacing "tobacco" with "aromatherapy".

I know this makes these type of vaporizers legal according to the law, but I was under the impression that AdWords policies wanted to regulate drug facilitating products despite them being legal, just like you prohibit pipes and bongs.

If I started a shop selling bongs and pipes claiming they were for aromatherapy only I'm sure AdWords policy team would disapprove any advertisement, but they work just like these type of vaporizers except their heating are by combustion while the vaporizers are electric or by butane. They all heat up the cannabis drug to a high temperature and then the user inhale the smoke/vapor orally.

If you find any community online discussing vaporizers I am confident you will only find communities discussing their use for recreational drug use and not aromatherapy. Here is one of them dedicated to vaporizers enthusiasts who wish to stop combusting cannabis in favor of using these type of vaporizers:

http://**bleep**combustion.com/

And have a look at their "Supporting Retailers" with official accounts from each vaporizer shop:
http://**bleep**combustion.com/forums/supporting-retailers.19/

 

Edit: Well the profanity filter got to the urls. Here's a redirecting link: http://bit.ly/1sg4Iuk

I guess any of these shops could too advertise on AdWords (and I'm sure some currently do, I can't check for ads in United States) as long as they write "For Aromatherapy use only" everywhere on their websites?

What I find strange is that AdWords allows the seller of vaporizers to determine what their products are to be used for instead of looking at the vaporizers themselves. There are no aromatherapists using or recommending these type of vaporizers for aromatherapy as they require the user to inhale the vapor orally instead of what aromatherapy is about - aromas to be picked up by the nose or skin.

Here you answer in another thread from an advertiser wanting to promote their drug facilitating vaporizers:
https://www.en.adwords-community.com/t5/Ad-Approval-Policy/Adwords-Suspended-Vaporizer-Aromatherapy-...

This is the same product you found problems with on a website currently being advertised on AdWords:
http://www.namastevapes.co.uk/collections/featured-vaporizers/products/magic-flight-launch-box-vapor...

It's a fact that these types of vaporizers are meant for recreational drugs no matter how many aromatherapy labels the sellers put on them and I think AdWords should prohibit them "categorically" as long as they are not used as diffusers (i.e output the produced vapor into the atmosphere instead of having to be inhaled orally).

Re: Products that facilitate drug use now OK?

Top Contributor
# 5
Top Contributor

Hello again;

You can submit to Google a compliment only about a specific landing page demonstrating the violation within the text on the landing page.
Unless you show  the violation on the website Google will not take action.


My suggestion: submits to Google screenshots showing  the violation.
General statements, interpretations of the text, or references to external sources (though could be correct) - would not prompt   an action by Google. (And that is what probably happened, in this case).

-Moshe

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
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Re: Products that facilitate drug use now OK?

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 6
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From your answer I take it as long as their landing pages are good enough at misleading that the products are meant to be used for aromatherapy they will continue to be able to advertise on AdWords.

I'm actually baffled the AdWords policy team has so different stances when it comes to different types of products that facilitate cannabis use. Pipes and bongs are not allowed under any circumstances, but their electronic equivalent are OK as long as they call it aromatherapy?

Or what about adding a water tool (also sold by the same shops) to the "aromatherapy vaporizer" and now all of a sudden you have a product working exactly like a bong, except it's fueled by electricity and not combustion.

Re: Products that facilitate drug use now OK?

Top Contributor
# 7
Top Contributor

Hello again

>>>"

I take it as long as their landing pages are good enough at misleading that the products are meant to be used for aromatherapy they will continue to be able to advertise on AdWords."

 

As said; Please provide specific sanding pages, showing the misleading claims - so Google can take action!

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
Did you find any helpful responses or answers to your query? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer’

Re: Products that facilitate drug use now OK?

[ Edited ]
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 8
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Im fully aware of what you said, but I don't believe their landing pages are the problem.
The problem is that the AdWords policy team are willing to condone the advertisements of vaporizers meant for recreational drug use as long as they misrepresent them as made for aromatherapy.

If the policy team only looks at their landing pages without taken in to account how the vaporizers in fact operate then of course they will find nothing wrong and reporting them would be useless.

I'm not looking to report specific sites here, I want to understand how the policy makers think when they decide that vaporizers that are clearly not meant for aromatherapy (as they produce vapor to be inhaled orally) are OK, but at the same time other products like bongs and pipes are prohibited by much broader policies. Why not apply the same logic for all products potentially being used for recreational drug use?

Re: Products that facilitate drug use now OK?

Top Contributor
# 9
Top Contributor
We are running into the meaning/ interpretation of of the product usage. (Whoever could serve also for drugs)
Google does not disclose the protocol on which it makes its arbitration.
Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
Did you find any helpful responses or answers to your query? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer’

Re: Products that facilitate drug use now OK?

[ Edited ]
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 10
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And here I thought this community was to help "Understand Google’s advertising policies".

In the previous advertising policies vaporizers were mentioned twice.
In one place under the health section it said vaporizers were allowed for aromatherapy use, but under the dangerous products they were prohibited alongside bongs and pipes.

Obviously the Policy team knows there are different types of vaporizers, but it seems like it's just up to the sellers to call them aromatherapy products and it's all good in Googles book.

I was hoping that the new policies would show "more transparency into why we have each policy" as announced, but alas it's now even harder to tell what is allowed and not when it comes to vaporizers.