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Understand Google's advertising policies, including ad approval status and account suspension
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Associations need an end in Google policy

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# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Hi all,

 

In my understanding Adwords remembers everything for the life of an Adwords account. So if you advertise domain www.prettypinkflowers.com adwords will forwever associate that domain with your (my examples are made up by the way). Iunderstand the intent of this policy but believe its implimentation is flawed, as - in the real world - people actually do become dis-associated with a domain.

 

Here's a 'for instance' - lets say I had two sites: prettypinkflowers.com and prettypurpleflowers.com

 

It turns out that purple flowers are not a hit and the site does not serve me well, so I do not renew the domain registration when it comes due as it is not justifying the renewal fee. Of course, I delete the campaign that promoted prettypurpleflowers.com when I let the domain go - but prettypinkflowers.com is doing well, so I continue to promote it. 

 

However .... soon after a shady, pharmaceutical selling, pyramid-scheming no-gooder picks up the prettypurpleflowers.com domain that I let go and fills it with everything that causes Adwords accounts to get banned.

 

From my reading it appears I could lose my account - even though the domain is no longer within my control - because it is still contained in a 'deleted' campaign. As best I have been able to find (after many hours of research) the Google reasoning is this - because a deleted campaign can be re-enabled at any time the landing page must always be 'clean' in regard to policy. It is my understanding that bots regularly check these things and can trigger an account suspension based on the contents of the landing page.

 

I get that there are bad guys out there and my research has brought me a far greater understanding of the challenges Google faces in this regard. However, this policy seems to entrap people who mean well and are not doing harm themselves - but are judged guilty by an association that has long gone.

 

My question arises as I have domains I want to de-register (purpleflowers) but others I want to keep promoting (pinkflowers). On the face of it the policy requires that I commit for lifetime renewal fees of any domain I advertise. This is, naturally, not feasible so on a policy front, I believe some changes are needed.

 

On a practical front, I wondered if this would be a workaround for now. Before I lose prettypurpleflowers.com - while the campaign is still enabled (but paused) - I change the landing page for all the ads to prettypinkflowers.com. After doing that I delete the campaign. Now, when the bot samples the deleted campaign it will be led to my active, compliant, page.Would that fix the situation I have described?

 

Thanks folks

 

Oz Boy

 

 

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Accepted by topic author Ozboy
September 2015

Re: Associations need an end in Google policy/ acoount and website violation

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Ozboy; Welcome to our community;

 

This is a very nice question; and I really appreciate that you did some reading and investigation of that, before posting;

 

My answer is based on a similar case we had, that is referenced at the end of my reply, where a Google employee explained this specific policy issue,

 

In principle you are right: A website must be brought into compliance with the Policy, before un-suspending the account linked to this website.


The question how you determine to which account the website is linked:?


  • If you advertise a website that violates the Policy, and instead of bringing the site into compliance, you choose to sell the domain - your account can be suspended, and you will not be allowed to advertise, as long as the domain is not in compliance, though you have no control over it anymore . (You sold it)
  • But, if you sell the domain, and only later on - when owned by someone else - it violates the Policy, then, the new owner's account is at risk. If you buy again the domain, you have to make sure that it is in full compliance, prior to re-launching a campaign.

 

Here is a similar case we had a few months ago. It's a little long one. Read Brain's posts

https://www.en.adwords-community.com/t5/Set-up-and-basics-get-started/Suspended-for-a-campaign-delet...

 

-Moshe

 

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
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View solution in original post

Marked as Best Answer.
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Accepted by Zee (Community Manager)
September 2015

Re: Associations need an end in Google policy/ acoount and website violation

Top Contributor
# 4
Top Contributor

OZboy;

Quote: "A clear moral in the story though is to never ignore a site policy warning!"


This is the "Holy Grail" of the AdWords policy team.

 

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
Did you find any helpful responses or answers to your query? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer’

View solution in original post

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author Ozboy
September 2015

Re: Associations need an end in Google policy/ acoount and website violation

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Ozboy; Welcome to our community;

 

This is a very nice question; and I really appreciate that you did some reading and investigation of that, before posting;

 

My answer is based on a similar case we had, that is referenced at the end of my reply, where a Google employee explained this specific policy issue,

 

In principle you are right: A website must be brought into compliance with the Policy, before un-suspending the account linked to this website.


The question how you determine to which account the website is linked:?


  • If you advertise a website that violates the Policy, and instead of bringing the site into compliance, you choose to sell the domain - your account can be suspended, and you will not be allowed to advertise, as long as the domain is not in compliance, though you have no control over it anymore . (You sold it)
  • But, if you sell the domain, and only later on - when owned by someone else - it violates the Policy, then, the new owner's account is at risk. If you buy again the domain, you have to make sure that it is in full compliance, prior to re-launching a campaign.

 

Here is a similar case we had a few months ago. It's a little long one. Read Brain's posts

https://www.en.adwords-community.com/t5/Set-up-and-basics-get-started/Suspended-for-a-campaign-delet...

 

-Moshe

 

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
Did you find any helpful responses or answers to your query? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer’

Re: Associations need an end in Google policy/ acoount and website violation

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 3
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Moshe,

 

Thank you! I had not seen that particular thread. I feel better now that you can succesfully 'let go' of a domain without it comning back to haunt you.

 

A clear moral in the story though is to never ignore a site policy warning! Its clearly critical to fix it and ask for a review so you can get that black mark off your name while you can!

 

Cheers

 

OzBoy

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by Zee (Community Manager)
September 2015

Re: Associations need an end in Google policy/ acoount and website violation

Top Contributor
# 4
Top Contributor

OZboy;

Quote: "A clear moral in the story though is to never ignore a site policy warning!"


This is the "Holy Grail" of the AdWords policy team.

 

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
Did you find any helpful responses or answers to your query? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer’