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Understand Google's advertising policies, including ad approval status and account suspension
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AdWords Domestic Policy Raises Security Risk

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

The issue with opening up our website (or any website) to global access for Google to approve the adwords is that this opens up the site to a vastly larger audience of hackers and malware. PHP inserts and various other problems can be largely avoided by geo-blocking IP addresses outside of the target area. There is no security software that is 100% safe so blocking the IPs of certain hotspot countries in particular is very helpful. I found the answers here to be lacking in understanding the security risk that Google is creating for it's customers. When I had this problem today, I asked for a list of countries to Whitelist at least. This was also unable to be provided. The firm condition from Google is unnecessary for local businesses, creates extra server load and provides hackers with more opportunity. This would be easy to fix or at least mitigate somewhat by providing  white list. The post above that talks about using a VPN, while technically accurate, is unhelpful as most hackers are mass scanning techniques not necessary targeting or getting so sophisticated as using a VPN. Most hackers are opportunists. Shutting the front door won't prevent the dedicated hack but it will discourage the vast majority. Very disappointed in Google requiring me to take this security risk.

AdWords creates security risk

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 2
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Just found out that Google requires our client site to be accessible worldwide. If it can't be accessed from anywhere, AdWords calls it a policy violation. Google is forcing a terrible choice - either don't use AdWords or open up your site to the ever increasing security risk of global access. Geo-blocking a website prevents the majority of foreign attacks. While it's true a hacker could use VPN, few do for the lazy opportunist attacks with PHP inserts and the like. Google's policy serves Google but not many local clients. A local business that gets all of it's business from a 10 mile radius has no good business reason to have traffic to their site globally. It creates extra server load and junk worldwide traffic and bandwidth consumption. It opens up a site to massive potential malware and spam. It's surprising that Google is forcing this risk on local organizations. Isn't Google sophisticated enough to resolve this without opening AdWords customers to greater risk? And please don't say that getting extra junk traffic is good for SEO. That's just silly and harkens back to 2005 to get traffic for traffics sake.